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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Living in New Orleans we deal with potholes similar to the upper peninsula in MI. I've developed a bubble in a sidewall, and also have a different tire that I had to have patched because of a roofing nail after hurricane Ida. I'm currently running on Nexen CP671s in the stock 235 size with about 20k miles on the set of 4.

I have a few questions as how best to move forward, and would love your opinions:

Obviously i'm about to ask you if I can replace a single axle, but would I get an effect similar to the SH-AWD and Gofl R AWD systems if I put the new ones on the back and essentially overdrive the rear axle? Apparently it makes for some pretty fun handling characteristics, but am I asking to burn up my RDU clutches?

If I put the new ones on the front as conventional wisdom dictates, wouldn't the RDU be under the same stress during engagement? Should I just replace all four? I can afford it, its just the Eco-reality of throwing away 3 good tires with 50k miles of life left in them in the garbage.

What would you do in this situation? I'm debating on upgrading to 245/40r19 but i just hate throwing away good tires.
 
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Living in New Orleans we deal with potholes similar to the upper peninsula in MI. I've developed a bubble in a sidewall, and also have a different tire that I had to have patched because of a roofing nail after hurricane Ida. I'm currently running on Nexen CP671s in the stock 235 size with about 20k miles on the set of 4.

I have a few questions as how best to move forward, and would love your opinions:

Obviously i'm about to ask you if I can replace a single axle, but would I get an effect similar to the SH-AWD and Gofl R AWD systems if I put the new ones on the back and essentially overdrive the rear axle? Apparently it makes for some pretty fun handling characteristics, but am I asking to burn up my RDU clutches?

If I put the new ones on the front as conventional wisdom dictates, wouldn't the RDU be under the same stress during engagement? Should I just replace all four? I can afford it, its just the Eco-reality of throwing away 3 good tires with 50k miles of life left in them in the garbage.

What would you do in this situation? I'm debating on upgrading to 245/40r19 but i just hate throwing away good tires.

Hi 65dustin. A few things: First, if only replacing one or two tires, you always install the new tires on the rear, not the front. This information can be verified by going to any tire manufacturers website or expert tire site (such as The Tire Rack etc.). For example: https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=52

Next...you can replace one tire if the tread difference between the new and old tires will be no more than ~3/32". For general information on that, you can look here: https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=18

This tread depth versus AWD information is also basically covered in our Owner Manuals.

All of the above is "conventional" and accepted wisdom.

Feel free to ask any questions, let us know how you make out and good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Decided on 4 new Toyo 245/40R19 XLs. Going on tomorrow morning. Hoping the wider tread helps prevent this kind of stuff in the future!! Thanks for the advice @bbf2530. Your help and advice on this forum is great!
 

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IMO, not that worried about minor differences in front/rear tire speed. What % of the time is the RDU @ 100%
that it is really "locked", possibly creating any minor bind?

I also put my new tires on the front. I spent a lot of time modyfing my rear sway bar trying to get some oversteer on this car.
Heck, if new front, old rear tires causes oversteer, I'm all for it, LOL!! That and if I have to have an older tire have a slightly
better chance at a blowout vs a new tire, rather not have it on the steering axle. I'll take the risk of hydroplaining into oversteer
all day long over a steering axle blowout, both of which have the same chance on roads near me (IE, I don't hydroplane ever,
just doesn't happen).

I realize my thinking does not go along with the "experts", what else is new.
So "follow" me at your own peril!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, guys; all the ridiculous "supply chain" issues finally worked out a win for the customer. When I dropped the FuSpo off for the Toyo's, they called me back to let me know only one had shown up, and that they had some Goodyear Eagle F1 Asymmetric A/S's down the road and were having them delivered and would eat the difference in my Toyo's that were already paid for.

Boys, these are the best tires I've ever owned. They transformed the FuSpo from a rough, loud, hard-riding sportscar to a luxurious, supple, quiet, compliant GT mile muncher. I'm sure it's a mix between the new compound and the wider tread increasing the comfort, but I'd highly recommend going to the 245 size. Another great benefit is that the extra width is going to keep the wheels VERY safe. There's a solid half inch between the top of the sidewall and the top of the rim.

They're a lot softer than the Nexen CP671's that the dealer put on, but even though they're softer, it seems they grip better around corners. Whereas the cornering forces used to come from the outside of the tread on the old tires, it feels like the new ones have a bigger shoulder to shift more weight into the middle of the tread, and I've noticed increased grip in the wet so far. The 245s seem far less stressed under the weight of the car in everyday driving. Pothole shocks are more damped, cat's eyes are less upsetting, and rough roads now seem to be soaked up by the tires, instead of the suspension. Even a few less interior rattles on some roads.

I can't recommend these enough if you're an everyday driver and just want good tires that give a good ride and shut the hell up most of the time. I'm falling in love with the car all over again with them on now.
 

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Well, guys; all the ridiculous "supply chain" issues finally worked out a win for the customer. When I dropped the FuSpo off for the Toyo's, they called me back to let me know only one had shown up, and that they had some Goodyear Eagle F1 Asymmetric A/S's down the road and were having them delivered and would eat the difference in my Toyo's that were already paid for.

Boys, these are the best tires I've ever owned. They transformed the FuSpo from a rough, loud, hard-riding sportscar to a luxurious, supple, quiet, compliant GT mile muncher. I'm sure it's a mix between the new compound and the wider tread increasing the comfort, but I'd highly recommend going to the 245 size. Another great benefit is that the extra width is going to keep the wheels VERY safe. There's a solid half inch between the top of the sidewall and the top of the rim.

They're a lot softer than the Nexen CP671's that the dealer put on, but even though they're softer, it seems they grip better around corners. Whereas the cornering forces used to come from the outside of the tread on the old tires, it feels like the new ones have a bigger shoulder to shift more weight into the middle of the tread, and I've noticed increased grip in the wet so far. The 245s seem far less stressed under the weight of the car in everyday driving. Pothole shocks are more damped, cat's eyes are less upsetting, and rough roads now seem to be soaked up by the tires, instead of the suspension. Even a few less interior rattles on some roads.

I can't recommend these enough if you're an everyday driver and just want good tires that give a good ride and shut the hell up most of the time. I'm falling in love with the car all over again with them on now.
Post up some pics when you get a chance, even the tread. I can look them up online, but we all love FS pics.
 

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Isn't that the OEM tire?
Hi LeVeL. Yes, the Goodyear Eagle F1 Asymmetric All-Season is listed as the factory OEM tire for all three model years of the Fusion Sport (in the 235/40/19 size).

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If that’s OEM feel, then don’t put Nexen tires on unless you want it to feel considerably worse. Those were my only experience in the fusion so far. Thanks Santa Fe Ford lol.
Pics to come once I get the lube nastiness off of em!
 

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If that’s OEM feel, then don’t put Nexen tires on unless you want it to feel considerably worse. Those were my only experience in the fusion so far. Thanks Santa Fe Ford lol.
Pics to come once I get the lube nastiness off of em!
Hi 65dustin. Yes, that particular Nexen model can not be compared to that particular Goodyear model. And that leads to a glaring question about the Dealership installing that model Nexen tire on your Fusion Sport.

That question is...What speed rating were those Nexens? At least on The Tire Rack, they only show an H-Rated CP671 available in the Fusion Sport OEM size. An H rated tire should never have been installed on a Fusion Sport. Now perhaps there is a V or higher speed rated CP671 available which was on your car, but it does not seem so according to The Tire Rack.

Next...The Nexen CP671 is a basic "Passenger All-Season" category tire, while the Goodyear Eagle F1 Asymmetric All-Season is an "Ultra High Performance All-Season" tire. The two categories are worlds apart.
You put "Passenger All-Season" tires on a Toyota Corolla. Not a Fusion Sport. Which is why the Fusion Sport comes with the Goodyear Eagle F1 Asymmetric All-Season, "Ultra High Performance All-Season" tire from the factory.
Now, I know there are those owners who did not care for the Goodyear OEM tire, but that all comes down to personal opinions, not performance categories.

And that Nexen tire never should have been installed on your Fusion Sport, if they were H-rated.

Anyway, just some basic tire information, for anyone who cares.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
When I called the tire store this time around, the speed rating was the top priority. I’ve always been worried about the 130mph limit on the Nexens. And, it wasn’t the previous owner. When it came off lease it sat in Orlando for a while, was sold to Santa Fe Ford at auction and when they recon’d it they stuck those tires on it according to the carfax. At $130/ea, I’m sure that was their primary reasoning.
 

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When I called the tire store this time around, the speed rating was the top priority. I’ve always been worried about the 130mph limit on the Nexens. And, it wasn’t the previous owner. When it came off lease it sat in Orlando for a while, was sold to Santa Fe Ford at auction and when they recon’d it they stuck those tires on it according to the carfax. At $130/ea, I’m sure that was their primary reasoning.
Hi 65dustin. Yes, you stated that in one of your earlier posts, which was why I stated that the Dealer never should have installed an H-rated tire on your Fusion Sport.

A vehicle owner can install whatever they please (although it would not be smart). However, a Dealer should know better and never have installed an H-rated tire when the OEM tire is W rated.

Hope that makes my previous reply more understandable.

At least you have a properly rated tire on now. ;)

Good luck.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Happy weekend, Gentlemen!
Friday wash and quick detail:

His good side:
Tire Plant Wheel Vehicle Car

Just kidding they’re both gorgeous:
Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Vehicle registration plate

A few more:
Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Automotive tire

Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Automotive tire

Wheel Tire Plant Automotive tire Hood

Automotive parking light Tire Car Wheel Vehicle

@OX1
Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Hood


Products used:
Meguiar’s deep crystal car wash
Mother’s Instant Detailer
Windex
Armor All Tire Foam
Trombone Shorty’s new album and a bunch of Michelob Ultra’s.
 
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