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Now if they would only show the torque curves across entire rpm range, and not just peak torque, that would actually be useful.
 

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I highly doubt they would post the full dyno sheets. Unfortunately we're gonna have to wait for an aftermarket brand or an individual owner to get a proper dyno sheet
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Now if they would only show the torque curves across entire rpm range, and not just peak torque, that would actually be useful.
Here is a dyno run of a bone stock 2015 Ford F150 2.7 Ecoboost.

I would expect the Fusion Sport to look very close as both engines have similar outputs with peaks varying 2-500 rpms.
  • Ford F-150: 325hp @ 5750rpm / 375 lb-ft @3000rpm
  • Ford Fusion Sport: 325hp @ 5500rpm / 380 lb-ft @3500rpm
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Are the gear ratios the same though ?
I wouldn't use this graph to attempt to figure out what exact torque output the Fusion Sport is going to have at a given rpm. Way too many variables to do that. But we can see "where" it is producing torque.

Allow me to generalize a little bit. When it comes to engine torque outputs (of the performance variety) you get "peaky" and "broad/flat". Just knowing the peak number would not tell you what kind of torque curve the engine produces.

So, based on this dyno graph we see the same engine tuned to produce similar final outputs falls into the "broad/flat" category.
 

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So, based on this dyno graph we see the same engine tuned to produce similar final outputs falls into the "broad/flat" category.
Well, sure, typically any turbo or supercharged engine will have a more flat torque curve as compared to an NA engine. Engineers can use ECU/turbo programming to help flatten it out.

But looking at the one you posted (thanks, by the way!), it appears you need to be north of 2,000 rpm before things really start to happen. Compare this to the engine in 340i where max torque is already reached at 1,380 rpm.

Again, that's not necessarily a terrible thing. Just different characteristics. That's why I made the initial comment that it would be more useful to compare torque curves instead of peak torque numbers.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well, sure, typically any turbo or supercharged engine will have a more flat torque curve as compared to an NA engine. Engineers can use ECU/turbo programming to help flatten it out.

But looking at the one you posted (thanks, by the way!), it appears you need to be north of 2,000 rpm before things really start to happen. Compare this to the engine in 340i where max torque is already reached at 1,380 rpm.

Again, that's not necessarily a terrible thing. Just different characteristics. That's why I made the initial comment that it would be more useful to compare torque curves instead of peak torque numbers.
I wouldn’t read too much into the power curve starting at 2000 rpm. It has to do with how the dyno applies load to the engine. In most cases the dyno cannot apply load properly to turbocharged engines in order to bring the boost high enough at low rpm to see the manufacturer claimed peaks that start at 1300 rpm.

Case in point, look at this dyno run for the 340i you mentioned (I have attached a stock vs. tuned dyno chart). There is nothing approaching peak numbers until 2500 rpm. Far from the 1300 rpm BMW states.
 

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