Ford Fusion V6 Sport Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I know this car is recommended to use 93 Octane, but there's almost no gas station around that offers it, so I'm wondering how it runs on 87 Octane and if there's a chance of any damage occurring because of the gas type? Closest I have around is 94 Octane and that ain't cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
I've run mostly 87. Haven't noticed any issues, car is still plenty fast. Did 93 the last two tanks. Can definitely feel a difference in power, but not 40-50 cents/gal worth imo unless you're heading to the track.

You can always run 91 if 93 isn't readily available. Lot of states barely have any 93 stations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
So I spent 3 hours reading on this topic last night in the F150 forums... from what the 100s of comments I saw all agreed was that the engine will run fine with no issues on 87 Octane, but you get more performance HP/Torque and 1-2 more MPG (depending on types of driving) by using 93 Octane. The comments were pretty brutal and I am glad the crowd we have here is better, but they all seemed to agree that there is no issue with 87 Octane with the engine.

I am going to put 93 Octane, because it is easy to find here and I don't mind the extra cost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
I have used 91...that's all i can find in San Diego...




not that I'm really looking for...but i swear he said it needed 91. (didn't say anything higher), and no i didn't read the manual.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
car will be just fine running 87
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
Runs totally fine on 87. Around here the 87 has up to 10% ethanol the 89 up to 5% and the 91 is straight gas.
93 and above is very difficult to find within 60 miles of my location so I run 91 with my tune.

I will see how she runs come summer, but will continue to run 91. It runs 3.20 USD a gallon which is about .40 USD more per gallon than 87.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
I just wanted to throw my $.02 in here. I ran 93 for the first couple tanks when I got the car in October, since it is very readily available here in NE Ohio and we were having a very long, mild fall. When I switched to 87 once winter finally showed up, I did notice a drop in MPG, not a hugely noticeable difference in performance. That might be more of a winter thing than an octane thing... First off, don't believe this car's MPG calculator, it is terrible. I use the trip computer to track the miles between fill-ups and it routinely calculates 19.X MPG for the "trip" meanwhile doing it myself its been more like 16.X which is versus my calculations during fall of around 18-20 depending on how much fun I had with that particular tank...

for my money, I don't really see a $.40-.50 per gallon difference in performance. MPG will have to be seen in similar weather conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
I just wanted to throw my $.02 in here. I ran 93 for the first couple tanks when I got the car in October, since it is very readily available here in NE Ohio and we were having a very long, mild fall. When I switched to 87 once winter finally showed up, I did notice a drop in MPG, not a hugely noticeable difference in performance. That might be more of a winter thing than an octane thing... First off, don't believe this car's MPG calculator, it is terrible. I use the trip computer to track the miles between fill-ups and it routinely calculates 19.X MPG for the "trip" meanwhile doing it myself its been more like 16.X which is versus my calculations during fall of around 18-20 depending on how much fun I had with that particular tank...

for my money, I don't really see a $.40-.50 per gallon difference in performance. MPG will have to be seen in similar weather conditions.
Would make sense for MPG to drop in winter. Naturally, the car is going to be sitting idle a couple of more minutes than normal to warm up. Do that once or twice a day adds up to a decent chunk of fuel IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
I have to go by memory here, because shockingly, I can't find any hard evidence to back up what I think I remember. In my 2010 For Mustang GT, which is rated at 315hp/325 ft lb. torque, on 87 octane, if you put in premium gas (93 octane) you would get an increase of both 10hp and 10lb ft. of torque. I can tell you I could never tell the difference. The car has felt pretty much identical to me with either regular gas (87) or premium (93). I now have just over 40K miles on my 'Stang, and to this day, I can't tell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
346 Posts
Would make sense for MPG to drop in winter. Naturally, the car is going to be sitting idle a couple of more minutes than normal to warm up. Do that once or twice a day adds up to a decent chunk of fuel IMO.
Do not let your car idle to warm up... says it in the manual... have read sooo many times not to let your car "warm up"... warming up is for carbureted car is only it's to allow the fuel air mixture her to become optimal before you take off especially during cold conditions ... but with our modern cars you're supposed to wait 15 to 30 seconds for the idols to drop to below 1000 RPM ... and then GO... and has been gone over multiple times that the best way to warm up your car is to drive it... it decreases the life of the engine by stripping oil away from the engine's cylinders and pistons...
Warming Up Your Car in the Cold Just Harms the Engine
Here is a good article about it...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Do not let your car idle to warm up... says it in the manual... have read sooo many times not to let your car "warm up"... warming up is for carbureted car is only it's to allow the fuel air mixture her to become optimal before you take off especially during cold conditions ... but with our modern cars you're supposed to wait 15 to 30 seconds for the idols to drop to below 1000 RPM ... and then GO... and has been gone over multiple times that the best way to warm up your car is to drive it... it decreases the life of the engine by stripping oil away from the engine's cylinders and pistons...
Warming Up Your Car in the Cold Just Harms the Engine
Here is a good article about it...
Maybe not, but in colder areas, this isn't really great advice, it really sucks getting into a car at -30C and having nothing warm yet. Remote Starters exist for a reason.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
346 Posts
Maybe not, but in colder areas, this isn't really great advice, it really sucks getting into a car at -30C and having nothing warm yet. Remote Starters exist for a reason.
It might suck to get into a cold car were nothings warm yet but we have heated seats and heated steering wheel which work pretty quick and I'm not trying to bust anyone's hump... just stating facts that letting your car warm up and not just settling idle, is bad for the engine... just stating the facts... I'll take a cold morning over sacrificing engine life any day
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Do not let your car idle to warm up... says it in the manual... have read sooo many times not to let your car "warm up"... warming up is for carbureted car is only it's to allow the fuel air mixture her to become optimal before you take off especially during cold conditions ... but with our modern cars you're supposed to wait 15 to 30 seconds for the idols to drop to below 1000 RPM ... and then GO... and has been gone over multiple times that the best way to warm up your car is to drive it... it decreases the life of the engine by stripping oil away from the engine's cylinders and pistons...
Warming Up Your Car in the Cold Just Harms the Engine
Here is a good article about it...
I'm guessing that in VA, it doesn't quite get as cold as it does here in NE Ohio, at least not with any regularity... when its 3 degrees (F), for weeks at a time, the idle takes more than 30 seconds to drop... and the windows fog up immediately anyway when I try driving right away, so I end up waiting in the cold car rather than in my warm house. There are merits to warming up the car, just not for the car...
 
  • Like
Reactions: DaMiFo

·
Registered
Joined
·
346 Posts
I'm guessing that in VA, it doesn't quite get as cold as is does here in NE Ohio, at least not with any regularity... when its 3 degrees, the idle takes more than 30 seconds to drop... and the windows fog up immediately anyway when I try driving right away, so I end up waiting in the cold car rather than in my warm house. There are merits to warming up the car, just not for the car...
Agreed...

originally from NY, where it gets pretty cold just moved to VA a little over a year ago to get away from snow... lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Agreed...

originally from NY, where it gets pretty cold just moved to VA a little over a year ago to get away from snow... lol
See, there you go! I'm sure you know very well from NY winter.

Sometimes I think about moving to a warmer locale, but I just can't leave my city and my lake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
626 Posts
I have to go by memory here, because shockingly, I can't find any hard evidence to back up what I think I remember. In my 2010 For Mustang GT, which is rated at 315hp/325 ft lb. torque, on 87 octane, if you put in premium gas (93 octane) you would get an increase of both 10hp and 10lb ft. of torque. I can tell you I could never tell the difference. The car has felt pretty much identical to me with either regular gas (87) or premium (93). I now have just over 40K miles on my 'Stang, and to this day, I can't tell.


On a naturally aspirated car, for sure.
Forced induction is a whole different ballgame.
Most people don't realize, boost is just a measurement of inefficiency, that's how much air is NOT going into the intake.
I'll take a degree of timing over a lb. of boost any day, and that takes octane to keep the engine happy.
Tuners make big power with a properly tuned car, and big power comes from timing.
Although all this talk about boost if fun too.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,524 Posts
I have to go by memory here, because shockingly, I can't find any hard evidence to back up what I think I remember. In my 2010 For Mustang GT, which is rated at 315hp/325 ft lb. torque, on 87 octane, if you put in premium gas (93 octane) you would get an increase of both 10hp and 10lb ft. of torque. I can tell you I could never tell the difference. The car has felt pretty much identical to me with either regular gas (87) or premium (93). I now have just over 40K miles on my 'Stang, and to this day, I can't tell.
I don't think anyone has found power numbers on 87 vs 93 for our engines, but the 2.3L EcoBoost loses 35HP and 20ft/lb on 87 gas, and the 2.0L is similar to that (a little less, tho). I'd imagine our engine would be similar as well. As La Flama Blanca said, turbos and these EcoBoost engines are very different.

Either way, back to the original question: Ford themselves say 87 is fine, but advertised power is only with 93 octane. I only run 93 in mine. But we ran 87 in my last Fusion 2.0 and our last Escape 2.0, both had 45k miles when the leases were up - never any issues. I know, different engine, but Ford knows most owners don't want to pay premium gas prices.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Do not let your car idle to warm up... says it in the manual... have read sooo many times not to let your car "warm up"... warming up is for carbureted car is only it's to allow the fuel air mixture her to become optimal before you take off especially during cold conditions ... but with our modern cars you're supposed to wait 15 to 30 seconds for the idols to drop to below 1000 RPM ... and then GO... and has been gone over multiple times that the best way to warm up your car is to drive it... it decreases the life of the engine by stripping oil away from the engine's cylinders and pistons...
Warming Up Your Car in the Cold Just Harms the Engine
Here is a good article about it...
I wouldn't consider this article factual, any engine should be warmed up to allow the oil to circulate through out the engine, the FS is a twin turbo and if you start driving it right away "cold" and need to bring it under load, you could be in for a very expensive lesson! at over 10,000 rpm's that's what the turbo's spin at without adequate lubrication, because the oil has not warmed up, it can cause bearing failure, take it for what ever it's worth
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
346 Posts
I wouldn't consider this article factual, any engine should be warmed up to allow the oil to circulate through out the engine, the FS is a twin turbo and if you start driving it right away "cold" and need to bring it under load, you could be in for a very expensive lesson! at over 10,000 rpm's that's what the turbo's spin at without adequate lubrication, because the oil has not warmed up, it can cause bearing failure, take it for what ever it's worth
I am not saying you should just start our cars and go... but you should not let it warm up for 4-5 mins... it should not take longer than 2 mins of the engine running under any normal circumstances to warm up enough to start driving... but you should not sit and full throttle your car and do launches after the car has only been running 2 mins
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top