Ford Fusion V6 Sport Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So.... right now where I live, Alberta Canada, we are having a very deep freeze. Daytime highs are about -25 with the overnight lows of -40 Celsius ( -15 to -40 Fahrenheit). I hadn't driven my car in a couple days, so last night at about 7:30pm I figured I should start it, let it warm for a bit and all should be good. Or so I thought. My remote start didn't work, so I braved the cold and tried to start my car physically. Got a couple rugh rughs and then nothing. Tried a second time, still nothing. So I went into my garage, grabbed a extension cord and plugged in the block heater. 4 hours later, I figured that was long enough to get her to start and I'd try again. Same result. Getting a little concerned, I left her plugged in for the night and hoped that she'd start in the morning. Woke up and the first thing I did was go outside and try yet again. jumped in, hit the start button and............ Hallelujah!! she started.

Now some of you may be wondering the relevance to this little story and its that my previous car, a Chrysler 300M, was almost never plugged in. Even in -35 degree weather. And she always started. Never happy when it was that cold, oh.... boy.... did she complain, but always started. So the takeaway here is that when it gets to -30C ( -20F), definitely start thinking about plugging them in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
452 Posts
WIth that kind of temp, I would be worried about the battery.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 65dustin

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
It’s probably more the battery than the car itself. Purdue university winters in Lafayette, IN were -20F and we killed genuine Honda batteries yearly in a ‘17 CRV. The battery sat almost on top of the turbo and cycled twice daily between -20F and operating temperature.. no traditional battery withstands that for long.

Lots of mornings where we’d have to bust out the miniature jump box to help it crank, and since we’d bought it in Louisiana it didn’t have a block heater.

They’re heart-attack expensive, but I personally veeeery highly recommend lithium (LiFePO4) drop in replacements. They still have plenty of room to crank any engine even at a 10% charge (they’re all inherently crazy deeeeeep cycle, but still work well in high amp cranking/starting situations) I had one in an accord for 8 years and it survived the deep freeze winters no problem. It also started a 1980-something Detroit Diesel 6.2 in a 2500 Silverado that had been sitting in a field for 15 years. Two brand new DieHards were toast after 5 minutes but the lithium just kept pushing. The starter was smoking like crazy after 20 minutes of punishment, yet the battery just kept up the cranking amps. They’re amazing, but the one sized for our cars are $1k. It’s a straight up lifetime, indestructible battery though 🤷‍♂️

Probably wouldn’t work with our cars though since they’re so technical. They’re 14.4 nominal voltage.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DarkArkAngel

·
Registered
2017 Ford Fusion Sport
Joined
·
39 Posts
My Dad , stationed in Fairbanks AK in the early 50's , would bring the battery from his '48 Chevy inside his billets every night during winter . Not sure if they had block heaters back then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
I remember being a kid in Russia and my dad would have to pull the battery out of his Lada (i.e. poorly made Fiat, which wasn't meant for cold weather to begin with), bring it inside, and recharge it overnight. Luckily down here in New England I've never even needed a tender or block heater. Although my old Miata did have electrical issues so I had to jump it often, but that's another story.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,588 Posts
I was doing my morning run (4F or so, no windchill but I couldn't feel my face and it doesn't feel good) and one of my neighbors went to start his MKS or F-150, can't recall which but it had a 3.5L V6 starter (it's very noticeable to my ear) and it cranked very slowly. Normally the Taurus/Explorer/F-150 3.5 V6 starter does a very quick turnover with a distinct sound. So definitely check your batteries. The newer Fords with Ford Pass, SYNC3, etc... have electronics that run all the time so that has a greater draw than the more basic or older Fords. That's why almost every Fusion at the dealership in the winter needs a jump start.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
928 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: LeVeL

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I'm also in Edmonton, downtown. I never had issues like this, but some good information here. I now live in a condo building with underground parking, moved in about a year ago... I hope I never have to live without heated parking. I always run full synthetic engine oil in hopes it would be of benefit in the extreme cold, but I guess it doesn't help if the battery is having issues.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
928 Posts
I'm also in Edmonton, downtown. I never had issues like this, but some good information here. I now live in a condo building with underground parking, moved in about a year ago... I hope I never have to live without heated parking. I always run full synthetic engine oil in hopes it would be of benefit in the extreme cold, but I guess it doesn't help if the battery is having issues.
There shouldn't be a single person on these forums NOT running full synthetic in their Sport. Shame on anyone that isn't.
 
  • Like
Reactions: OX1 and maydk65

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,588 Posts
Just run a Dexos 1 Gen 2 certified oil and you should be set. That’s GMs requirement for GTDI engines and makes more sense than Fords nebular spec numbers. Costco 5W30 is synthetic and certified Dexos as well as API SP and GF6A. Those account for chain wear from soot as well as LSPI.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
im also in the prairies and experiencing the same winter blast... i dont have a FS yet but this question is very relevant to my future hopefully :D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
928 Posts
It's not a Fusion Sport thing. It's a battery thing. Some batteries handle cold better than others. If you live where it gets cold, find a battery with more cold cranking amps. If you live where it's really cold fairly often, a block heater and/or battery tender are a good idea.

My car lives outside, and it's supposed to get to -30°F with -40°F windchills. I'll let you know if I have any issues with no block heater and stock battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,588 Posts
If you can, hook up a Battery Tender to the battery. They have a waterproof unit that is really good. I think I've bought about 6 of those over the years. They sit outside in an unheated detached garage in the winter or outside. I've tried other brands but they all have a tendency to overcharge the batteries. The Battery Tender circuitry/programming is rock solid. In maintenance mode it maintains 13.2 VDC at 50-150 mA, to provide a maintenance charge and to combat parasitic drain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
It's not a Fusion Sport thing. It's a battery thing. Some batteries handle cold better than others. If you live where it gets cold, find a battery with more cold cranking amps. If you live where it's really cold fairly often, a block heater and/or battery tender are a good idea.

My car lives outside, and it's supposed to get to -30°F with -40°F windchills. I'll let you know if I have any issues with no block heater and stock battery.
Well -30F would certainly give it trouble not sure if it would start. But the wind chill shouldn't really effect it the wind chill is for bodies. The only thing the wind chill would do is cool the block down faster but not make it any colder. The dealer says the cars don't come standard with block heaters anymore id because of fuel injection, the computer is supposed to handle that. But I think -30 would not start. Up in Canada I would think block heaters would be standard as temperature regularly gets -25 to -40. In US it doesn't hit -25 to -40 that often.
 

·
Registered
2017
Joined
·
31 Posts
The dealer says the cars don't come standard with block heaters anymore id because of fuel injection, the computer is supposed to handle that. But I think -30 would not start. Up in Canada I would think block heaters would be standard as temperature regularly gets -25 to -40. In US it doesn't hit -25 to -40 that often.
That doesn’t make much sense To me. My Fusion came with a block heater. I’m not sure if you can even buy a new car without one in Minnesota. I’m also not sure why fuel injection would make one unnecessary. Maybe someone who knows more than me can chime in but it is my understanding that the block heater keeps the oil from getting too cold or thick making it easier to turn the engine over for your battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
If you can, hook up a Battery Tender to the battery. They have a waterproof unit that is really good. I think I've bought about 6 of those over the years. They sit outside in an unheated detached garage in the winter or outside. I've tried other brands but they all have a tendency to overcharge the batteries. The Battery Tender circuitry/programming is rock solid. In maintenance mode it maintains 13.2 VDC at 50-150 mA, to provide a maintenance charge and to combat parasitic drain.
I use a Battery Tender Jr for an RV battery in storage and another Jr for a summer car. Have you had experience with the Jr. version? Seems to work great for my uses...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,588 Posts
I use a Battery Tender Jr for an RV battery in storage and another Jr for a summer car. Have you had experience with the Jr. version? Seems to work great for my uses...
I only have their waterproof model (800mA), the 5A model, and the Costco 4.5A model (looks like the same 5A design but with button for AGM, Li-Ion, and was made specifically for Costco). I did extensive testing on Battery Tender and their circuitry/software is very good. In its final charging stage, the maintenance/trickle charging, it will provide consistent 13.2 VDC voltage with just enough current to keep the battery topped off and fight parasitic drain.

I've tried Pulsetech, BatteryMinder, NOCO, and a few others... the Pulsetech boils the batteries keeping them at 14.5 VDC!!! The BatteryMinder wasn't too bad but 13.8 VDC seems a bit high for me. I've been using the Tender waterproof units since 2006 without any problems.

I only suggested the waterproof model if you car is parked outdoors and you can just leave the Tender on the ground or in your engine compartment, just make sure your extension cord connections are sealed/away from water. The waterproof model is heavily potted, with its internals totally coated in potting material so it weighs a LOT, and it is totally solid state.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,588 Posts
That doesn’t make much sense To me. My Fusion came with a block heater. I’m not sure if you can even buy a new car without one in Minnesota. I’m also not sure why fuel injection would make one unnecessary. Maybe someone who knows more than me can chime in but it is my understanding that the block heater keeps the oil from getting too cold or thick making it easier to turn the engine over for your battery.
I've always seen the block heater as an available option on order sheets. I don't know what is involved in retrofitting one for the 2.7 but it should be feasible.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
928 Posts
Block heaters are usually optional, and dealers in cold climate areas often order them with that option for the same reason it's hard to find an f150 or Ranger without a tow package even though it's optional. The dealer just figures there's enough demand that it's silly not to include them in their orders.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top