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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, I follow an OpenPilot forum on Discord where they have been attempting to get full self driving on the vehicles using the open source hardware provided by OpenPilot. I don't know 100% of everything but I'm gonna try to explain as best I can. Most fully loaded Fusions have all the hardware for driving themselves, just not the software.

Basically for the last few months the big issue has been that Ford put a lockout on the lane keep assist system that disables it for 100ms every 10 seconds when it detects a constant input, meaning we can't just hack into the inputs for the system. There was some talk of utilizing the active park assist system (since the lockout is disabled under 10mph) for steering but the steering but it's kinda janky, since it involves making the power steering control module think it's going on 10mph at all times. This also has the unfortunate side effect of borking the torque mapping on the wheel, so it's easy to turn at all speeds.

However, this was just posted on the 2G Fusions Forum earlier and now we may have a way forward. Lane centering 2014 Fusion SE... just finished and working

It seems that a whole swap of the steering system from a Ford Edge with some extra stuff was able to get Lane Centering working on an older Fusion. Since me and the guy who has been most working on OP for Ford's are thinking that it may be possible to enable on our Fusions with just a reflash of the power steering module, I'm gonna look into buying a second hand PSCM and flashing it with the Edge firmware (assuming we can).

Anywho, I thought I would drop this here for everyone to look at and discuss while we figure out what we are looking at.
 

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Okay
Hey all, I follow an OpenPilot forum on Discord where they have been attempting to get full self driving on the vehicles using the open source hardware provided by OpenPilot. I don't know 100% of everything but I'm gonna try to explain as best I can. Most fully loaded Fusions have all the hardware for driving themselves, just not the software.

Basically for the last few months the big issue has been that Ford put a lockout on the lane keep assist system that disables it for 100ms every 10 seconds when it detects a constant input, meaning we can't just hack into the inputs for the system. There was some talk of utilizing the active park assist system (since the lockout is disabled under 10mph) for steering but the steering but it's kinda janky, since it involves making the power steering control module think it's going on 10mph at all times. This also has the unfortunate side effect of borking the torque mapping on the wheel, so it's easy to turn at all speeds.

However, this was just posted on the 2G Fusions Forum earlier and now we may have a way forward. Lane centering 2014 Fusion SE... just finished and working

It seems that a whole swap of the steering system from a Ford Edge with some extra stuff was able to get Lane Centering working on an older Fusion. Since me and the guy who has been most working on OP for Ford's are thinking that it may be possible to enable on our Fusions with just a reflash of the power steering module, I'm gonna look into buying a second hand PSCM and flashing it with the Edge firmware (assuming we can).

Anywho, I thought I would drop this here for everyone to look at and discuss while we figure out what we are looking at.
This is seriously cool. I always just assumed the Edge and FFS PSCM was the same hardware. Is that true? If a flash from the Edge disables that cutoff that would be interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Okay


This is seriously cool. I always just assumed the Edge and FFS PSCM was the same hardware. Is that true? If a flash from the Edge disables that cutoff that would be interesting.
That's what we are super hoping for. Ideally, all I should need to do is reflash the PSCM on my Fusion and it should work properly. I am concerned however as the left side buttons on the 2019 Edge look a little different than my Fusion (which is absent both ACC and Stop and Go sadly).
 

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Deleted saw the video.
 
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I remember reading about this software a while back and wondered if someone had tried it out on a Fusion. Below is the article I read from The Drive. Pretty interesting idea and I'm happy to see it is building some momentum out in the wild.

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I remember reading about this software a while back and wondered if someone had tried it out on a Fusion. Below is the article I read from The Drive. Pretty interesting idea and I'm happy to see it is building some momentum out in the wild.

Yeah its cool stuff! Hopefully if this works we can utilize the OP system instead of the built in Ford system to do the thinking. Seems the other user on 2GFusions had to change a significant amount of hardware at significant cost to complete this mod. The worst being the IPMA, which when I looked just barely stands at a whopping $700 for a 2019 Edge. They updated it with the fancy MobilEye chip.
 

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Yeah its cool stuff! Hopefully if this works we can utilize the OP system instead of the built in Ford system to do the thinking. Seems the other user on 2GFusions had to change a significant amount of hardware at significant cost to complete this mod. The worst being the IPMA, which when I looked just barely stands at a whopping $700 for a 2019 Edge. They updated it with the fancy MobilEye chip.
A question I have is what if you're using your homebuilt driving system and it fails resulting in a crash. Would insurance cover it? Or would they tell you to screw off because you were playing with fire lol. I feel like OpenPilot and the other OEM Driving assist programs will eventually have to deal with this when it moves beyond level 2 Autonomy.

Another question is what if that crash results in a death (morbid I know lol) who is liable for it? Does the driver get a manslaughter charge? I don't believe there is any current precedent to give the courts some ability to decide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A question I have is what if you're using your homebuilt driving system and it fails resulting in a crash. Would insurance cover it? Or would they tell you to screw off because you were playing with fire lol. I feel like OpenPilot and the other OEM Driving assist programs will eventually have to deal with this when it moves beyond level 2 Autonomy.

Another question is what if that crash results in a death (morbid I know lol) who is liable for it? Does the driver get a manslaughter charge? I don't believe there is any current precedent to give the courts some ability to decide.
I agree. I personally fall to the side of the driver always bears responsibility. These features are best used as driving assistants, not replacements. I plan to always keep my hang on the wheel will in a self-driving mode, because then I can always react if something happens. Until we reach a point where a self-driving vehicle is capable of handling 90% of all bad situations thrown at it, I will feel no sympathy for those who crash into a tree or kill someone because they were playing Angry Birds instead of driving.
 

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A question I have is what if you're using your homebuilt driving system and it fails resulting in a crash. Would insurance cover it? Or would they tell you to screw off because you were playing with fire lol. I feel like OpenPilot and the other OEM Driving assist programs will eventually have to deal with this when it moves beyond level 2 Autonomy.

Another question is what if that crash results in a death (morbid I know lol) who is liable for it? Does the driver get a manslaughter charge? I don't believe there is any current precedent to give the courts some ability to decide.
Hi Brandon. The answer to your first question: While there are outside/fringe variables, the insurance company would pay. Unless they claim the driver did something criminally negligent. Keep in mind taht even when the insurance company pays, the accident will be on the drivers record, their rates will usually go up, they may face policy cancellation, etc.

The answer to your second question: We (the driver) are always supposed to be in control of our vehicle and are responsible for what happens when we are behind the wheel. So a driver will be responsible for any accident outcome, whether it be property damage, physical/bodily damage or death. And yes, that can include manslaughter charges etc.

Of course, whether the companies that provide the hardware and software for these present and future driving aids can also be held responsible in Criminal and/or Civil court will be decided on a case by case basis in the near future. But the driver will always be the one primarily responsible, both in any criminal or civil proceedings.

Hope I wrote that in an understandable manner. Good luck.
 
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Hi Brandon. The answer to your first question: While there are outside/fringe variables, the insurance company would pay. Unless they claim the driver did something criminally negligent. Keep in mind taht even when the insurance company pays, the accident will be on the drivers record, their rates will usually go up, they may face policy cancellation, etc.

The answer to your second question: We (the driver) are always supposed to be in control of our vehicle and are responsible for what happens when we are behind the wheel. So a driver will be responsible for any accident outcome, whether it be property damage, physical/bodily damage or death. And yes, that can include manslaughter charges etc.

Of course, whether the companies that provide the hardware and software for these present and future driving aids can also be held responsible in Criminal and/or Civil court will be decided on a case by case basis in the near future. But the driver will always be the one primarily responsible, both in any criminal or civil proceedings.

Hope I wrote that in an understandable manner. Good luck.
Very understandable. I know that as a driver we are responsible for all things that happen while we are behind the wheel. But I suppose my second question was more geared towards driver assists going beyond level 2 autonomy that we currently have. Like once we hit level 5 the car is supposed to perform all functions without driver intervention. so are we even considered the "driver" at that point? Purely a hypothetical question obviously because currently only level 2 cars exist on the market.

It seems like most auto manufacturers haven't even considered this yet as everyone is so focused on just getting a product out there.
 

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Very understandable. I know that as a driver we are responsible for all things that happen while we are behind the wheel. But I suppose my second question was more geared towards driver assists going beyond level 2 autonomy that we currently have. Like once we hit level 5 the car is supposed to perform all functions without driver intervention. so are we even considered the "driver" at that point? Purely a hypothetical question obviously because currently only level 2 cars exist on the market.

It seems like most auto manufacturers haven't even considered this yet as everyone is so focused on just getting a product out there.
Hi Brandon. I tried to answer both questions. The short answer to your second question is...Yes, we will still be considered the driver and have full responsibility.

It is no different legally than cruise control was when introduced years ago, or with Adaptive Cruise Control now. If we had/have an accident due to inattention while using them, we can not claim that the device/electronics/computer is to blame. Will not matter if it is Level 2, Level 5 or whatever Level "X" they may come out with in the future.

Legally, we must be in control of our vehicle at all times. That will not change. No matter what devices and nannies are being used.

I can give many explanations and examples, but that is the correct answer. Whoever is in the drivers seat is responsible. And in civil proceedings (a lawsuit), sometimes also the owner of the vehicle, if different than the driver. Will some people also sue the device manufacturers? Certainly. But that is simply an attempt to go after anyone/everyone with deep pockets. Now...how much responsibility the manufacturers will bear in court is a legal question which will be decided in the future.And juries are fickle.
However, I believe it will be similar to Adaptive Cruise Control...in that we can not blame it on the device, since we are legally responsible for control of the vehicle at all times.

Good luck.
 

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Hi Brandon. I tried to answer both questions. The short answer to your second question is...Yes, we will still be considered the driver and have full responsibility.

It is no different legally than cruise control was when introduced years ago, or with Adaptive Cruise Control now. If we had/have an accident due to inattention while using them, we can not claim that the device/electronics/computer is to blame. Will not matter if it is Level 2, Level 5 or whatever Level "X" they may come out with in the future.

Legally, we must be in control of our vehicle at all times. That will not change. No matter what devices and nannies are being used.

I can give many explanations and examples, but that is the correct answer. Whoever is in the drivers seat is responsible. And in civil proceedings (a lawsuit), sometimes also the owner of the vehicle, if different than the driver. Will some people also sue the device manufacturers? Certainly. But that is simply an attempt to go after anyone/everyone with deep pockets. Now...how much responsibility the manufacturers will bear in court is a legal question which will be decided in the future.And juries are fickle.
However, I believe it will be similar to Adaptive Cruise Control...in that we can not blame it on the device, since we are legally responsible for control of the vehicle at all times.

Good luck.
Sounds like the trick is to stay out of the drivers seat - maybe the back seat? Just joking around. I don’t think we have any clue how the law looks at self-driving vehicles in the long term. Laws evolve with technology.
 

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Hi Brandon. I tried to answer both questions. The short answer to your second question is...Yes, we will still be considered the driver and have full responsibility.

It is no different legally than cruise control was when introduced years ago, or with Adaptive Cruise Control now. If we had/have an accident due to inattention while using them, we can not claim that the device/electronics/computer is to blame. Will not matter if it is Level 2, Level 5 or whatever Level "X" they may come out with in the future.

Legally, we must be in control of our vehicle at all times. That will not change. No matter what devices and nannies are being used.

I can give many explanations and examples, but that is the correct answer. Whoever is in the drivers seat is responsible. And in civil proceedings (a lawsuit), sometimes also the owner of the vehicle, if different than the driver. Will some people also sue the device manufacturers? Certainly. But that is simply an attempt to go after anyone/everyone with deep pockets. Now...how much responsibility the manufacturers will bear in court is a legal question which will be decided in the future.And juries are fickle.
However, I believe it will be similar to Adaptive Cruise Control...in that we can not blame it on the device, since we are legally responsible for control of the vehicle at all times.

Good luck.
Hi CG. Actually, I gave a very good clue. ;)

The driver will always be the ultimate responsible party.

People involved in accidents (and their lawyers) will still sue the manufacturers of the technology (and the auto manufacturers). And sometimes will win, since juries are fickle. However, by law, the driver of the vehicle must always maintain control and will always bear the ultimate responsibility.

Good luck.
 
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Hi CG. Actually, I gave a very good clue. ;)

The driver will always be the ultimate responsible party.

People involved in accidents (and their lawyers) will still sue the manufacturers of the technology (and the auto manufacturers). And sometimes will win, since juries are fickle. However, by law, the driver of the vehicle must always maintain control and will always bear the ultimate responsibility.

Good luck.
I suspect as technology improves and drivers become simply riders and not “drivers,” the principal liability may shift to manufacturers. Perhaps entirely. Or no fault. Time will tell. In the meantime, I’m sure you are correct on present law. I have a lot of attorneys in my life, and there is always the default of “anyone can sue anyone for anything.“. But in a self-driving world, it will be hard to prove negligence when all we do is get in the car and tell it our destination.
 
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I suspect as technology improves and drivers become simply riders and not “drivers”, the principal liability may shift to manufacturers. Perhaps entirely. Or no fault. Time will tell. In the meantime, I’m sure you are correct on present law.
Hi CG. Although they say "Never say never", it is extremely safe to say that for a multitude of reasons, the law will never change to shift the principal liability to the manufacturers.

One of the primary reasons? It would be financially prohibitive. If laws like that were ever even proposed, auto manufacturers would quickly stop offering, installing and selling the technology on their vehicles.
It is very simple...The driver will never be considered a rider or passenger. The driver of the vehicle will always be required to be in ultimate control of the vehicle. And legally responsible if they are not.

As stated earlier, drivers involved in accidents (and their lawyers) will always sue everyone, especially those with the deepest pockets. And sometimes they will win. But the underlying principal that the driver of a vehicle must always be in complete control of the vehicle and is the primary individual/entity liable for all that happens will not change.

It is and will remain a legal fact.

Good luck.
 
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Hi CG. Although they say "Never say never", it is extremely safe to say that for a multitude of reasons, the law will never change to shift the principal liability to the manufacturers.

One of the primary reasons? It would be financially prohibitive. If laws like that were ever even proposed, auto manufacturers would quickly stop offering, installing and selling the technology on their vehicles.
It is very simple...The driver will never be considered a rider or passenger. The driver of the vehicle will always be required to be in ultimate control of the vehicle. And legally responsible if they are not.

As stated earlier, drivers involved in accidents (and their lawyers) will always sue everyone, especially those with the deepest pockets. And sometimes they will win. But the underlying principal that the driver of a vehicle must always be in complete control of the vehicle and is the primary individual/entity liable for all that happens will not change.

It is and will remain a legal fact.

Good luck.
Bbf2530, you make some excellent points. Yet it is hard to imagine an owner of a vehicle can have any responsibility at all if the have no input or control of a vehicle. The principal that ownership alone drives liability seems odd. I’m not sure who will be liable. Not sure if automakers will have to accept full liability in order to sell self driving cars. In that case they could simply build litigation and settlement costs into the price of cars. But that does not make a lot of sense either. Or insurers might somehow take a different role. An owner of a 100% self driving vehicle is a passenger and an owner, not a driver. I respect your opinion but see future liability as less certain.
 
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Bbf2530, you make some excellent points. Yet it is hard to imagine an owner of a vehicle can have any responsibility at all if the have no input or control of a vehicle. The principal that ownership alone drives liability seems odd. I’m not sure who will be liable. Not sure if automakers will have to accept full liability in order to sell self driving cars. In that case they could simply build litigation and settlement costs into the price of cars. But that does not make a lot of sense either. Or insurers might somehow take a different role. An owner of a 100% self driving vehicle is a passenger and an owner, not a driver. I respect your opinion but see future liability as less certain.
Hi CG. Just a few points to make clear: First...Although the legal/registered owner of a vehicle can also be held financially/civilly responsible for the actions of someone else driving their vehicle, we were not discussing ownership as part of this driver liability discussion. So for the sake of simplicity, we can eliminate the "principal that ownership alone drives liability", since the driver of a vehicle is not necessarily the owner.
Second...If there is a steering wheel and brakes, the person behind the wheel still has ultimate "control" of the vehicle, even if they relinquish control to computers/cameras/radar/satellites etc.
Third, just want to make clear to others jumping in late that we are discussing "Self driving" vehicles that have a driver, not "self driving"/autonomous vehicles with no driver behind the wheel (if there is a wheel...lol)
Fourth...God forbid legal responsibility was ever removed from the driver of a vehicle, for technological or any other reasons. There are already for too many clueless/idiotic drivers on the road, without them being able to think what they do does not matter. That alone will assure primary legal responsibility remains on the driver of a vehicle (and yes, they are still a driver, not a "passenger")

Okay, so next..."Litigation and settlement costs" are obviously already built into the price of cars. However, those "litigation and settlement costs" would go sky high if primary liability for "self driving vehicles" became the responsibility of the manufacturers. It would essentially make future vehicles the playthings of the rich only. And let's face it, the automobile manufacturers would fight it with hordes of lawyers (and rightly so). And they would win a fight against being declared the primary party responsible for accidents occurring while "self driving technology' is in use. Whatever the Self Driving technology "Level" may be.
It will never happen. The driver of a vehicle is and will be required, by law, to be in ultimate control of their vehicle. They are still a "driver", not a passenger. By law.

Next...we do not need to wait for legal precedent. This is already established legal precedent. It has been upheld in the near and further past with technology such as cruise control, Adaptive Cruise Control, and in the accidents which have already occurred with early/current "self driving" vehicles.The fact that technology advances will not change the primary responsibility of controlling a road going vehicle being the driver. The driver must always maintain ultimate control of the vehicle. They are still a "driver", not a passenger. By law.

Earlier in our discussion, you (or someone) made a statement to the effect that the law changes with technology. Of course it sometimes does. However, not in this case, when it comes to legal responsibility.
And you mentioned you "...have a lot of attorneys in my life". Ask a few of them if the laws will ever be changed to state that a driver of a "self driving" vehicle (one with a steering wheel and brakes) will have no responsibility for accidents. Just make it clear we are not discussing whether manufacturers of the vehicle and self driving technology can/will also be able to be sued in civil court (they can and will), but whether a driver will have no responsibility for the accident. I'm just curious what they will say.

Jokingly
...I would add that one of us will go to bed tonight seeing "future liability as less certain", and one of us will go to bed tonight knowing what future liability will be, because it is not a Nostradamus level prediction. It is not a prediction at all, because the law is already clear and will remain so. Again, because technology does not always change law. especiialy when it comes to ultimate responsibility.

And I truly do respect your opinion too. However, I would only add (so my reply does not have to go on and on), that when I am expressing an opinion, I always state it is an opinion.
However, in this case, this is not an "opinion", this is legal fact and settled precedent, even though the technology will advance.

Good luck. :)
 
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Hi CG. Just a few points to make clear: First...Although the legal/registered owner of a vehicle can also be held financially/civilly responsible for the actions of someone else driving their vehicle, we were not discussing ownership as part of this driver liability discussion. So for the sake of simplicity, we can eliminate the "principal that ownership alone drives liability", since the driver of a vehicle is not necessarily the owner.
Second...If there is a steering wheel and brakes, the person behind the wheel still has ultimate "control" of the vehicle, even if they relinquish control to computers/cameras/radar/satellites etc.
Third, just want to make clear to others jumping in late that we are discussing "Self driving" vehicles that have a driver, not "self driving"/autonomous vehicles with no driver behind the wheel (if there is a wheel...lol)
Fourth...God forbid legal responsibility was ever removed from the driver of a vehicle, for technological or any other reasons. There are already for too many clueless/idiotic drivers on the road, without them being able to think what they do does not matter. That alone will assure primary legal responsibility remains on the driver of a vehicle (and yes, they are still a driver, not a "passenger")

Okay, so next..."Litigation and settlement costs" are obviously already built into the price of cars. However, those "litigation and settlement costs" would go sky high if primary liability for "self driving vehicles" became the responsibility of the manufacturers. It would essentially make future vehicles the playthings of the rich only. And let's face it, the automobile manufacturers would fight it with hordes of lawyers (and rightly so). And they would win a fight against being declared the primary party responsible for accidents occurring while "self driving technology' is in use. Whatever the Self Driving technology "Level" may be.
It will never happen. The driver of a vehicle is and will be required, by law, to be in ultimate control of their vehicle. They are still a "driver", not a passenger. By law.

Next...we do not need to wait for legal precedent. This is already established legal precedent. It has been upheld in the near and further past with technology such as cruise control, Adaptive Cruise Control, and in the accidents which have already occurred with early/current "self driving" vehicles.The fact that technology advances will not change the primary responsibility of controlling a road going vehicle being the driver. The driver must always maintain ultimate control of the vehicle. They are still a "driver", not a passenger. By law.

Earlier in our discussion, you (or someone) made a statement to the effect that the law changes with technology. Of course it sometimes does. However, not in this case, when it comes to legal responsibility.

Jokingly...I would add that one of us will go to bed tonight seeing "future liability as less certain", and one of us will go to bed tonight knowing what future liability will be, because it is not a Nostradamus level prediction. It is not a prediction at all, because the law is already clear and will remain so.

And I respect your opinion too. However, I would only add (so my reply does not have to go on and on), that when I am expressing an opinion, I always state it is an opinion.
However, in this case, this is not an "opinion", this is legal fact and settled precedent, even though the technology will advance.

Good luck. :)
I think I see where we agree now. Thank you for the added details. I was assuming total autonomous vehicles with no steering wheel and no brake, and no way for any kind of manual control. Admittedly a big jump from lane centering where this post started - lol. To be fair I hijacked the thread, and maybe your keen insight caused me to go to the driverless, fully autonomous example :).

You were assuming cars with driver assistance at different levels. If Elon Musk is correct, Tesla tech is approaching 10x safer than human drivers already, and we are just at the beginning. Which means wrecks, medical costs, lawyering and the like falls by 10x. Maybe 😊. Or falls by 100x. Maybe. For people who like to drive - like Sport owners - totallly autonomous sounds awful. But that may be the future of personal transport. Insurance is costly because humans make a lot of mistakes. Passengers with zero manual controls make zero mistakes. At that point, technology has advanced and wrecks are potentially 100 or 1000 times less likely. Yet there still is liability and there still are costs. My question is, who is most likely to pay those shrinking expenses? Driverless, fully autonomous car liability - where there is no backup driver - is not settled law, to my knowledge. Maybe we can go to bed both being right 😊

P.s.
 

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I think I see where we agree now. Thank you for the added details. I was assuming total autonomous vehicles with no steering wheel and no brake, and no way for any kind of manual control. Admittedly a big jump from lane centering where this post started - lol. To be fair I hijacked the thread, and maybe your keen insight caused me to go to the driverless, fully autonomous example :).

You were assuming cars with driver assistance at different levels. If Elon Musk is correct, Tesla tech is approaching 10x safer than human drivers already, and we are just at the beginning. Which means wrecks, medical costs, lawyering and the like falls by 10x. Maybe 😊. Or falls by 100x. Maybe. For people who like to drive - like Sport owners - totallly autonomous sounds awful. But that may be the future of personal transport. Insurance is costly because humans make a lot of mistakes. Passengers with zero manual controls make zero mistakes. At that point, technology has advanced and wrecks are potentially 100 or 1000 times less likely. Yet there still is liability and there still are costs. My question is, who is most likely to pay those shrinking expenses? Driverless, fully autonomous car liability - where there is no backup driver - is not settled law, to my knowledge. Maybe we can go to bed both being right 😊

P.s.
Hi CG. Aaaahhh...pronoun trouble! (obscure reference inserted) ;)

And I agree...we were both able to go to bed being right! WoooHooo! :cool: (I wear my sunglasses at night...;))

Yes, if we are discussing truly autonomous vehicles (no steering wheel, accelerator, brakes etc), then primary liability will be with the manufacturers of the vehicle, the technologies and the autonomous driving equipment. No driver controls, no driver. Only passengers. Oh...and I had previously read the article by that law firm.

Which is why (in my opinion), private vehicles will always have a steering wheel, accelerator and brakes. It maintains the driver as the primary controller of the vehicle, no matter the technology. And thus also focuses primary responsibility/liability on the driver, not the vehicle or technology.

And...I'm most happy about the fact that now we can both sleep well! ;)

As far as Elon Musk...I like the guy, but the only thing that surpasses his genius is his ability to grab headlines with showmanship and fantastical, outrageous, "off the cuff" statements. If he does not eventually wind up in prison for securities violations/fraud (he keeps dancing a fine line with his public statements), he may eventually turn out to be correct. :D

Okay...my wife, she is a callin'. Gotta' go!

Good luck CG! :)
 

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Hey all, I follow an OpenPilot forum on Discord where they have been attempting to get full self driving on the vehicles using the open source hardware provided by OpenPilot. I don't know 100% of everything but I'm gonna try to explain as best I can. Most fully loaded Fusions have all the hardware for driving themselves, just not the software.

Basically for the last few months the big issue has been that Ford put a lockout on the lane keep assist system that disables it for 100ms every 10 seconds when it detects a constant input, meaning we can't just hack into the inputs for the system. There was some talk of utilizing the active park assist system (since the lockout is disabled under 10mph) for steering but the steering but it's kinda janky, since it involves making the power steering control module think it's going on 10mph at all times. This also has the unfortunate side effect of borking the torque mapping on the wheel, so it's easy to turn at all speeds.

However, this was just posted on the 2G Fusions Forum earlier and now we may have a way forward. Lane centering 2014 Fusion SE... just finished and working

It seems that a whole swap of the steering system from a Ford Edge with some extra stuff was able to get Lane Centering working on an older Fusion. Since me and the guy who has been most working on OP for Ford's are thinking that it may be possible to enable on our Fusions with just a reflash of the power steering module, I'm gonna look into buying a second hand PSCM and flashing it with the Edge firmware (assuming we can).

Anywho, I thought I would drop this here for everyone to look at and discuss while we figure out what we are looking at.

Hey, im also currently working on this. 2017 ford fusion energi, considering using a rack that is physically broken that i can obtain cheaply or a core from my old workplace. Or do as you stated and get one from an Edge and flash the firmware to the one in my vehicle. We should start a discord or slack, ive seen some posts about the lockout and now they are gone from the comma ai discord.
 
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