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Discussion Starter · #161 ·
Just keep your max boost under 20 lbs.
Yeah I'm trying to leave a lot of the safeties on so I'm not going to wring it by out as much as some of you guys I'm sure but I'm cautious by nature. I'll make a point to keep it under 20 though.
 

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Okay so yeah if you do that, then do the same (or more) in your OP tables you'd be maintaining that "kick in the pants" feel at WOT (along with just making more power generally). I'm not where I can see it right now but I'll go take a look once I am.
I responded to your post on the HPT forum. The OP tables you're referring to sound like the Torque Limiter tables. I believe we only use OP 1 tables but I make changes to all of them to be sure. These don't control how much torque you want but limit it instead. So in this case they limit it to 382 ft-lb at a certain RPM band.

It all really begins with Driver Demand. In the older EcoBoost strategies (like 2013-2015 for most non-Fseries) you had a Base and then a Sport/Terrain driver demand table. What I did with that (on my SHO) was play with the Sport/Terrain mode driver demand so when I pushed the shifter down to S mode I'd get the bump in power. But in Drive, it's almost factory stock and I did this for fuel economy.

On the newer EcoBoost strategies (2015-up including Edge/Fusion Sport and ST, but not the SHO/ExSport as they remained the same until 2019) there's only 1 Driver Demand table. There's a pedal map table for Drive and Sport (or Mud/Sand/etc) that basically does what the pedal commander tries to do. What I normally do is increase the torque values in the near-WOT region of the Driver Demand table. I keep the rest stock for driveability and fuel economy. If I am going to the store to get groceries, I don't need the extra boost/air mass flow at part throttle conditions.

The PCM takes the demanded driver's torque and then looks at limiters for air flow, boost, temperature, torque, spark, etc... and does calculations to figure out the rest (Wastegate, diverter valve, throttle opening, spark, etc...) which is why the VE modeling is so important. The Tuning School and other tuners early on messed with the torque tables to trick the PCM into keeping the throttle open, but really the use of the electronic throttle body to manage boost is a higher tech method than what was used in the past. The challenge is when you change the VE modeling through modifications like displacement, bigger turbochargers, adding a supercharger, etc... anything changes the VE model of your powertrain.

It doesn't sound like you've started actually tuning the car yet and are exploring the settings. The guide I wrote should help you 85% of the way. Test, fix, test is the only way to come out of this from a DIY perspective. You need to make changes, test them out, datalog and datalog, analyze the datalog, revise your tune, test the new revision, etc...
 
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