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@OX1 - Fantastic car!!! We considered selling/trading our ‘66 for a ‘58-‘60 model a couple times because those are my wife’s favorite body style. What stopped us the two times we had a chance was the 352 engine. Finding a factory 430 is extremely hard. You’ve got a real gem there!!
Thanks. 390 drops right in, so pretty easy to upgrade (I also have another "parts" 60 that came with a built 390 and interestingly, an AOD).
Body was redone, but it was mostly torn apart. Not sure ultimately what I am going to do with it. I bought it right before
I stumbled on the nice 59/430 car.




I grew up in a white 60, my dad bought my mom for X-mas that year. They still have it, but it's a complete basket case.
I thought about restoring, but really too far gone. Was cheaper to get one with at least body work and paint done already.

 

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Yes, I’m way past that level of massive undertaking myself. I feel like the amount of money and time it takes to do a complete resto is better spent finding a high quality original or older restoration that’s 90+% and bring it to the level you want. With our car, we are just minimizing the miles we put on it and trying very hard to keep it original and still enjoy it. It’s not a concours vehicle by far, but more of a survivor. Great chrome and paint, almost no rust underneath, and the interior is good. Low miles are the key! The biggest problem we’re having is the wiring; every terminal and connection is slowly corroding and sometimes electrical things stop working for a while then start working again. I’m loathe to retire the car and there’s no NOS wiring harnesses that I can find (not like I’m scouting the planet or anything because I really wouldn’t want to take on that project). For now we are just enjoying taking it for the occasional drive, and cruise-in now and then.
 

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Yes, I’m way past that level of massive undertaking myself. I feel like the amount of money and time it takes to do a complete resto is better spent finding a high quality original or older restoration that’s 90+% and bring it to the level you want. With our car, we are just minimizing the miles we put on it and trying very hard to keep it original and still enjoy it. It’s not a concours vehicle by far, but more of a survivor. Great chrome and paint, almost no rust underneath, and the interior is good. Low miles are the key! The biggest problem we’re having is the wiring; every terminal and connection is slowly corroding and sometimes electrical things stop working for a while then start working again. I’m loathe to retire the car and there’s no NOS wiring harnesses that I can find (not like I’m scouting the planet or anything because I really wouldn’t want to take on that project). For now we are just enjoying taking it for the occasional drive, and cruise-in now and then.
You must be in some super corrosive area. I have one offroad rig that I've literally driven under water and has no major wiring harness issues. Being a late 70's "truck", it's on par
with the 60's cars, wiring-wise.

 

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The car was in a barn under a tarp for many years before we got it. The interior was mildewed and it took about three years of gentle cleaning and using an ion fan inside it before we could really drive it without having a massive allergic reaction! The corrosion on the wiring is just that green oxidation that gets on anything copper or brass. I keep the car in our attached garage, with a box fan running in front of it 24/7/365. It really helps retard rust & mildew to keep airflow going.
 

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You have to watch for the insulation on those old wires. The numerous heat cycles they go through over the years cause the insulation to dry and become brittle. This is what leads to shorts and fires. Once they reach a certain point, just touching them or moving the harness can cause the insulation to disintegrate, leaving bare copper. Keep and eye on that.
 
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You have to watch for the insulation on those old wires. The numerous heat cycles they go through over the years cause the insulation to dry and become brittle. This is what leads to shorts and fires. Once they reach a certain point, just touching them or moving the harness can cause the insulation to disintegrate, leaving bare copper. Keep and eye on that.
Yes, good advice! These T-birds with sequential turn signals often have relay failures and after replacing them once with NOS I switched to an aftermarket digital relay that looks exactly like original. During the replacement process I found several wires up inside the rear cowl that were basically bare in multiple places where the insulation simply dried up and fell off. Also, mice are another problem for infesting and destroying wiring and upholstery in some older cars but thank goodness we haven’t had that problem. We’ve owned this car a long time and I’ve watched as it has aged despite being driven very little. It’s a bummer to watch.
 

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The car was in a barn under a tarp for many years before we got it. The interior was mildewed and it took about three years of gentle cleaning and using an ion fan inside it before we could really drive it without having a massive allergic reaction! The corrosion on the wiring is just that green oxidation that gets on anything copper or brass. I keep the car in our attached garage, with a box fan running in front of it 24/7/365. It really helps retard rust & mildew to keep airflow going.
There is a guy on this board that parts out older birds. Carl Heller ~ partsetal
(specializes in squares, but the guy I'm thinking of has other years in the 60's I believe)

He may be able to get you an entire used harness. Yes, would not be new, but unless you leave it in a
"salt fog chamber", which it appears you are almost describing the way it was stored, the old harnesses
are in relatively decent shape many times.

Being that "wet", very surprised there is not more body rust.
 

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Wasn’t really wet. Just the type of damp dark that a barn is. There’s virtually no rust underneath or on body, all chrome is smooth and solid. The wiring and the headliner took the brunt of it. The original owner drove it 13,000 miles no winters before going blind then he died shortly afterwards. His family passed the car around for decades, not driving it, and eventually they lost an appropriate place to store it when it ended up in the grand-nephews neighbors barn. That’s where we found it. Covered in pigeon crap.
 

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Wasn’t really wet. Just the type of damp dark that a barn is. There’s virtually no rust underneath or on body, all chrome is smooth and solid. The wiring and the headliner took the brunt of it. The original owner drove it 13,000 miles no winters before going blind then he died shortly afterwards. His family passed the car around for decades, not driving it, and eventually they lost an appropriate place to store it when it ended up in the grand-nephews neighbors barn. That’s where we found it. Covered in pigeon crap.
Well, offer stands. Guy is not out to get rich off the stuff like some.
I've bought a couple things from him. Like an upper control arm for my 59
that I cleaned down with solvent, and then sat it in the garbage just to drain off.
Then forgot, piled more garbage on it, and ultimately threw it out. LOL!
 

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Thanks OX1! It’s always good to have a contact (pun intended) for electrical parts!!
 
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