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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have been running my car with Distance Indication enabled for a number of months now. I like the feature and I think it works well, but there's one odd characteristic I've observed that I wonder if anyone else has run into (who has enabled Distance Indication on their car as well). My car has 401a with Driver Assist, which I think is a requirement for the Distance Indication support to be enabled.

What I've observed, though, is that when I am cruising for a while with my adaptive cruise enabled (I haven't tried just switching to non-adaptive cruise yet to debug this, although I might just out of curiosity), and then cancel cruise control while leaving it turned on, I will sometimes have brief chimes, and a red box displayed in the lane keeping/cruise control area of the IPC. It goes away after about a second or less and everything goes back to normal. No DTCs are present (other than the typical CAN bus communications failures that get logged in normal operation), and everything functions normally. I should also mention that when I stop cruise control, I just cancel it with the steering wheel button, not turn it off completely. And I've never observed this happen if I just hit the brakes to cancel it, nor have I observed it if there's a car ahead of me within acquisition range at the time I cancel.

I've only ever seen this happen when there is no car in front of me, so the adaptive cruise isn't locked onto a lead car at the time. I have wondered whether this is maybe just a transient error that occurs while the system switches modes because the forward-looking systems are obviously enabled in either mode, but having just switched from adaptive cruise, perhaps it hasn't yet acquired a stable operational state.

The other theory I have is that maybe this is just CAN bus saturation during the state change. Either way, it's not a huge deal, but if anyone else has seen it I'd be interested to hear, especially if you have found some way to make it not happen. It isn't really a problem, but it's "unclean" so if there's a forscan setting that changes the behavior somehow (adds a slight delay before state transition to allow normalization of the systems, or something like that) I'd be interested in hearing about it.

In any event, it's not a huge deal, but I was just curious what others thought, and if anyone else has observed this. Or if I'm the only one who actually uses Distance Indication. ;)
 

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I’ll do my best to try this out for you on my next trip. Since I got it, I’ve driven it from Gainesville, FL to Slidell, LA (where I grew up) twice and back. Because radar cruise was a must-have for me, I figured I’d constantly take advantage in my “boring fusion” but holy $#¥+ the drivetrain constantly encourages me to just DRIVE. Love it for that. The I-10 runs have plenty of straights with one or two cars “in the way” to test out the upper limits of the power train. Always try to stay safe, but I love driving this car with my foot. Control freak I guess... only thing I get is “please keep your hands on the wheel” with my driving aids.
Just so I’m clear, are you using the FordPass trip tracking? Is that the distance indication? Or is distance ind. some hidden feature in FORScan?

sorry; noob here. Would love to help though, as the driver aid system package seems to be rare. Would love to know how many here have it. I “require it” mostly for traffic and lane holding and possible collision avoidance. Rarely like the way it follows cars at interstate speeds. It doesn’t predict the brake slams of further cars like humans can. Also it was a requirement because some vehicles have enormous insurance premium differences b/t the driver aid trims and non-driver aid trims, such as the CRV. Turns Geico didn’t care about that on the fusion, but happy I have it after driving the CRV with it for 3 years.
 

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That’s an awesome feature! Sounds pretty useful. Just ordered the USB adapter. 100% interested in being able to adjust the CCD in regular D mode...my first acronym! I’m still learning them all lol.

Thank you for your offer to help, and sorry I can’t yet!! I’d love to talk about FORScan over a beer or two via FaceTime or Zoom (screen sharing!!) or something if you’re interested.

Good luck figuring it out in the meantime:D
 

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Hi @65dustin It's something you can enable with Forscan. Here is a link (it's about halfway down the page): FORScan - Modify Module As-Built Data (Detailed)

If you try it I'd be interested to hear how it goes for you. Also if I can help with enabling it let me know. :cool:
@ Engineer - dumb question. I have not done anything with FORScan, but some of the tweaks here are interesting. Does any of this have the potential to mess things up with Ford when you go in for service. I know that can be the case with tunes (not always - depends on dealer/etc). Things like the Distance Indication and adjusting CCD in drive mode see cool....
 

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Hi @65dustin It's something you can enable with Forscan. Here is a link (it's about halfway down the page): FORScan - Modify Module As-Built Data (Detailed)

If you try it I'd be interested to hear how it goes for you. Also if I can help with enabling it let me know. :cool:
@Engineer - dumb question. I have not done anything with FORScan, but some of the tweaks here are interesting. Does any of this have the potential to mess things up with Ford when you go in for service? I know that can be the case with tunes (not always - depends on dealer/etc). Things like the Distance Indication and adjusting CCD in drive mode see cool
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
@Engineer - dumb question. I have not done anything with FORScan, but some of the tweaks here are interesting. Does any of this have the potential to mess things up with Ford when you go in for service? I know that can be the case with tunes (not always - depends on dealer/etc). Things like the Distance Indication and adjusting CCD in drive mode see cool
Hi @ColoradoGuy not a dumb question at all (what is a dumb question anyway?) As you've probably read on some of the other threads, I'm one of the more cautious people on here I think. I choose to cheer for, and admire, the Sports that get really tricked out by some folks on here, but I need my warranty because it's my daily driver (well, not so daily any more since the virus, but you get the idea I think).

Anyhow, I look at Forscan a little differently than, for instance, a tune. A tune is affecting drivetrain components and of course has very real safety and reliability issues if you're not careful. Actually even if you are, there's an increased risk with a tune just because the designed-in safety margin is reduced from that as configured by the manufacturer. The manufacturer has to build in an appropriate safety margin for things like drivetrain components, but that's all predicated on stock power levels, etc. So if you alter that with a PCM tune you're eating into that margin and taking on more risk.

But Forscan is just enabling features, or changing defaults really, that exist in the code as shipped by the manufacturer. You're not loading new code (well generally anyway). You're not altering the combustion cycle and shift points outside of manufacturer stock defaults or anything like that. It's just enabling features that are shipped in the hardware package, but not enabled because some components are shared among regions and trim levels, etc., and not enabled in all of those. So for instance, looking at the components required to implement Distance Indication (which I believe ships with the MKZs, although I can't verify that personally because I don't own one), the required hardware is basically the Driver Assistance Package with Adaptive Cruise as far as I can tell. I wanted the feature, so I enabled it and tested it on my car, and it works.

Now, that's not to say Forscan doesn't present some risks. For instance, if you're not careful you can really mess up your as-built data in your modules, and get DTCs, dash lights, limited features, loss of functionality (including even critical driver assistance systems like automatic emergency braking), etc. So you have to be careful, and I certainly wouldn't recommend anyone mess with anything they don't feel confident in changing. But I've added all kinds of features to my car, and they work really well.

Will it affect the warranty? Well, I don't think Ford can reasonably make a case (nor would they even likely try) for saying an engine problem shouldn't be covered because I enabled Distance Indication, for instance. But if I had some problem with my Adaptive Cruise that I couldn't explain, they might, if they noticed it. However, it would never come to that because if I ever had a problem with my Adaptive Cruise, I'd pull DTCs, see what problems were reported, then follow proper service procedures, and certainly if I couldn't get it resolved right away I would disable the Distance Indication just as part of troubleshooting. So before it ever went back to Ford I'd have already run through whatever diagnostics and minor repairs I could do myself, including disabling the Distance Indication (or whatever other related Forscan mods I'd made for whatever system was failing). So at that point I'd know Forscan wasn't related to the failure, since settings would be back at normal just from debugging the problem, and Ford could focus on repairing whatever hardware was failing at that point.

So I look at it this way: I'm willing to accept responsibility for some level of debug and testing of my own car, and of course for properly using Forscan in the first place, in exchange for the added functionality. Some of this is that my background is technology so I'm very comfortable with this side of things, much more so than with, for instance, opening up an engine. I don't even change my own oil, but I'm not afraid to use Forscan on pretty much anything. But you have to find your own comfort level with things.

All of that said, I don't think that, unless Ford actually reprogrammed a module, they would likely even notice it. I think if I brought the car in for regular service (oil change or something) I don't think they'd even realize I had made any Forscan changes to anything. And even if they did, it's up in the air whether or not they'd care. It's not the drivetrain. But never say never, right? It just depends on what goes wrong, but like I said I'm fully prepared to debug things from a DTC/Forscan/IT side, no problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That’s an awesome feature! Sounds pretty useful. Just ordered the USB adapter. 100% interested in being able to adjust the CCD in regular D mode...my first acronym! I’m still learning them all lol.

Thank you for your offer to help, and sorry I can’t yet!! I’d love to talk about FORScan over a beer or two via FaceTime or Zoom (screen sharing!!) or something if you’re interested.

Good luck figuring it out in the meantime:D
Hi @65dustin let me know if I can help with anything or answer any questions. Just so you know what I'm using over here, I've got the OBDLink MX+ Bluetooth adapter and I use a dedicated Windows laptop I only use for car stuff. :cool:
 

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@Engineer excellent write up. I’m in the same boat as you with the lifetime warranty and it being my only method of transportation.
I’ve purchased the USB version of the OBDII reader as recommended by the FORScan team, and am waiting for it’s arrival. Then just downloading and installing the trial version from there.

Ive heard the UI has improved dramatically from the years of 2016 where you could only alter the 12 digit codes, and there’s now some drop downs and stuff where you just enable disable what you want.

looking forward to loadin it up. I really appreciate your offer to assist and will likely take advantage as soon as I get scared, haha.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I also want to mention that when I enabled the Distance Indication, I enabled the option in the IPC as well as the BCM support, so I didn't just do the BCM-side. So I expect my current Distance Indication capabilities should be basically identical to what ships in a Lincoln vehicle, as far as the detection/alerting at a basic level is concerned (I realize there's an actual meter display in the IPC for the Lincolns but I don't think that's relevant here). Another thing..... It has occurred to me that this might just be a way for the car to say "hey be aware that for this moment in time I'm switching modes because I've just canceled cruise", and just make you aware that you're not forward-searching the same way you are when the ACC radar/camera are active-scanning. Of course, auto emergency braking is still watching, but the thought has crossed my mind that it might just be the car letting you know about that transition state. Anyhow all of this is just guessing at this point. ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
@Engineer excellent write up. I’m in the same boat as you with the lifetime warranty and it being my only method of transportation.
I’ve purchased the USB version of the OBDII reader as recommended by the FORScan team, and am waiting for it’s arrival. Then just downloading and installing the trial version from there.

Ive heard the UI has improved dramatically from the years of 2016 where you could only alter the 12 digit codes, and there’s now some drop downs and stuff where you just enable disable what you want.

looking forward to loadin it up. I really appreciate your offer to assist and will likely take advantage as soon as I get scared, haha.
@65dustin No problem, none of us were born doing this. :) I ended up buying the extended license just because it freaked me out, thinking about my license expiring then needing to make a change later. But I've messed with all kinds of stuff so I really want to be able to go in and change whatever I want at any time. A lot of folks just keep renewing whenever they need to change anything and that's fine too.

Yeah there are basically two UIs for most (not all, but most) of the modules. There's the hex codes interface where you can change anything, but you're sort of on your own other than what's available online (which is quite a bit really, but it's still something you have to be really careful with). Then there's the other UI which is available on most of the modules, which gives you at least most of the most common options available via simple descriptions and check boxes. Which is safer, but you still have to be careful because you can still enable something that will break a module, sometimes in subtle ways. Also, what it breaks isn't always even in the module you're adjusting. You might break something in the IPC by changing something in the PSCM, for instance. So just test everything really carefully. Back everything up. Make one change at a time and test everything. One of the first symptoms that something isn't right is you might be missing options in your IPC that used to be there. Or you'll get dash warnings. Shut down the car and restart it after any changes to make sure you don't light up your dash. ;)

You can also clear your DTCs with Forscan. I use it for that a lot. You'll probably see a lot of Communications Failures, that's just the network buses getting hit really hard and having transient comms failures usually so don't worry too much about that. You'll get a feel for it pretty quickly.
 

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Hi @ColoradoGuy not a dumb question at all (what is a dumb question anyway?) As you've probably read on some of the other threads, I'm one of the more cautious people on here I think. I choose to cheer for, and admire, the Sports that get really tricked out by some folks on here, but I need my warranty because it's my daily driver (well, not so daily any more since the virus, but you get the idea I think).

Anyhow, I look at Forscan a little differently than, for instance, a tune. A tune is affecting drivetrain components and of course has very real safety and reliability issues if you're not careful. Actually even if you are, there's an increased risk with a tune just because the designed-in safety margin is reduced from that as configured by the manufacturer. The manufacturer has to build in an appropriate safety margin for things like drivetrain components, but that's all predicated on stock power levels, etc. So if you alter that with a PCM tune you're eating into that margin and taking on more risk.

But Forscan is just enabling features, or changing defaults really, that exist in the code as shipped by the manufacturer. You're not loading new code (well generally anyway). You're not altering the combustion cycle and shift points outside of manufacturer stock defaults or anything like that. It's just enabling features that are shipped in the hardware package, but not enabled because some components are shared among regions and trim levels, etc., and not enabled in all of those. So for instance, looking at the components required to implement Distance Indication (which I believe ships with the MKZs, although I can't verify that personally because I don't own one), the required hardware is basically the Driver Assistance Package with Adaptive Cruise as far as I can tell. I wanted the feature, so I enabled it and tested it on my car, and it works.

Now, that's not to say Forscan doesn't present some risks. For instance, if you're not careful you can really mess up your as-built data in your modules, and get DTCs, dash lights, limited features, loss of functionality (including even critical driver assistance systems like automatic emergency braking), etc. So you have to be careful, and I certainly wouldn't recommend anyone mess with anything they don't feel confident in changing. But I've added all kinds of features to my car, and they work really well.

Will it affect the warranty? Well, I don't think Ford can reasonably make a case (nor would they even likely try) for saying an engine problem shouldn't be covered because I enabled Distance Indication, for instance. But if I had some problem with my Adaptive Cruise that I couldn't explain, they might, if they noticed it. However, it would never come to that because if I ever had a problem with my Adaptive Cruise, I'd pull DTCs, see what problems were reported, then follow proper service procedures, and certainly if I couldn't get it resolved right away I would disable the Distance Indication just as part of troubleshooting. So before it ever went back to Ford I'd have already run through whatever diagnostics and minor repairs I could do myself, including disabling the Distance Indication (or whatever other related Forscan mods I'd made for whatever system was failing). So at that point I'd know Forscan wasn't related to the failure, since settings would be back at normal just from debugging the problem, and Ford could focus on repairing whatever hardware was failing at that point.

So I look at it this way: I'm willing to accept responsibility for some level of debug and testing of my own car, and of course for properly using Forscan in the first place, in exchange for the added functionality. Some of this is that my background is technology so I'm very comfortable with this side of things, much more so than with, for instance, opening up an engine. I don't even change my own oil, but I'm not afraid to use Forscan on pretty much anything. But you have to find your own comfort level with things.

All of that said, I don't think that, unless Ford actually reprogrammed a module, they would likely even notice it. I think if I brought the car in for regular service (oil change or something) I don't think they'd even realize I had made any Forscan changes to anything. And even if they did, it's up in the air whether or not they'd care. It's not the drivetrain. But never say never, right? It just depends on what goes wrong, but like I said I'm fully prepared to debug things from a DTC/Forscan/IT side, no problem.
@Engineer - thank you for the detailed pro's and con's. Answers my questions and more. I love tech of all kinds. Always jump on beta software for my devices. I agree there is minimal risk with Ford for the kinds of things we are talking about doing with Forscan. What I have to decide is if I want another little hobby :). It does sound interesting as heck and I like the tweaks I read about. The practical side of me tugs the other way - don't mess your car up. I don't have in-depth IT experience and reading about hex codes makes me think this is not ready for prime time - for me. I am still noodling it tho. Thanks again. BTW I am guessing your handle "Engineer" is related to your occupation. Your posts are super interesting and well thought out and written. Kudos!
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
@Engineer - thank you for the detailed pro's and con's. Answers my questions and more. I love tech of all kinds. Always jump on beta software for my devices. I agree there is minimal risk with Ford for the kinds of things we are talking about doing with Forscan. What I have to decide is if I want another little hobby :). It does sound interesting as heck and I like the tweaks I read about. The practical side of me tugs the other way - don't mess your car up. I don't have in-depth IT experience and reading about hex codes makes me think this is not ready for prime time - for me. I am still noodling it tho. Thanks again. BTW I am guessing your handle "Engineer" is related to your occupation. Your posts are super interesting and well thought out and written. Kudos!
Hi @ColoradoGuy I completely understand. What I would suggest is to start with something small, like the number of blinks for the turn signal if you just tap it. The default is 3, but I've increased mine to 5. I like it better that way. I'd suggest something like that just to get a feel for it. It's fairly low-risk, especially if you use the GUI interface. The other thing is, if you back everything up, and make careful notes of what you're changing, you should be able to back out in pretty much any case I can imagine, so you should be able to recover in any event.

The real dangers I see are these:

1. Disabling some critical safety system accidentally (in my experience you'll usually get dash warnings if this happens though)
2. Disabling some minor functionality accidentally, which then disappears without you realizing it (some IPC options or gauges disappear, for example)
3. Altering settings and not having backups of the originals so you can't figure out how to set them back to factory (which could be either breaking functionality or simply changing a default you later want to change back but can't because you don't have backups or remember what you changed)

Do be aware that the loss of functionality may sometimes occur post-Forscan, even by some period of time. For example, if you receive a Sync system update, the new code can invalidate your Forscan changes since they weren't as shipped from factory. For instance, in earlier versions of the APIM, GT themes were supported. Those themes were later removed from the APIM code. Having the GT theme on earlier versions was fine, but having a GT theme configured via Forscan would cause your APIM to be completely unusable after the update. Recovery would require Forscan changes to reset the APIM back to values supported by the new version of code. This is one reason (of several) that I purchased an extended license for Forscan. It's also important to remember that in our cars, Sync system updates are not, of course, the only way you could receive updates. Dealers could update module code any time you bring the car in. In fact, for most of your modules, that would be required in order to receive an update, because the Sync updates won't affect most modules, and our cars don't receive vehicle firmware over-the-air updates like they do on Sync 4-based vehicles.

Anyhow if you have an interest I encourage you to consider making at least some minor changes, if you're interested in doing so. There are plenty of us on here who would be willing to help and advise along the way. It's easier than it sounds, just be very deliberate. If you run beta software on your devices you're one of us. :cool:
 

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Train driver? That’s amazing. Love watching the train viewpoints they put on YouTube as time lapses from around the world. What a cool job!

One more question; can you trade these backed up files? For instance, if I find someone with a 17 with the same updates as mine, could I just upload a config file obtained via email to mine?

Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
One more question; can you trade these backed up files? For instance, if I find someone with a 17 with the same updates as mine, could I just upload a config file obtained via email to mine?
Oh definitely don't just take someone else's config straight up and load it. You want to set specific settings, but because each vehicle is different, the settings you start with are different. You only want to change what needs changed for each setting. Say for example, a value needs 4 added to enable cornering lights on your fogs. If the value you have now is 8, you need to change that to C. Whereas if right now it's a 0, you would change it to 4. So you can see where if you just straight up load someone else's config it can really mess things up. That's also a good reason to use the GUI instead of the hex codes too, until you get familiar with what's going on. It really does have most of the more common options in there.
 

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Hi @ColoradoGuy not a dumb question at all (what is a dumb question anyway?) As you've probably read on some of the other threads, I'm one of the more cautious people on here I think. I choose to cheer for, and admire, the Sports that get really tricked out by some folks on here, but I need my warranty because it's my daily driver (well, not so daily any more since the virus, but you get the idea I think).

Anyhow, I look at Forscan a little differently than, for instance, a tune. A tune is affecting drivetrain components and of course has very real safety and reliability issues if you're not careful. Actually even if you are, there's an increased risk with a tune just because the designed-in safety margin is reduced from that as configured by the manufacturer. The manufacturer has to build in an appropriate safety margin for things like drivetrain components, but that's all predicated on stock power levels, etc. So if you alter that with a PCM tune you're eating into that margin and taking on more risk.

But Forscan is just enabling features, or changing defaults really, that exist in the code as shipped by the manufacturer. You're not loading new code (well generally anyway). You're not altering the combustion cycle and shift points outside of manufacturer stock defaults or anything like that. It's just enabling features that are shipped in the hardware package, but not enabled because some components are shared among regions and trim levels, etc., and not enabled in all of those. So for instance, looking at the components required to implement Distance Indication (which I believe ships with the MKZs, although I can't verify that personally because I don't own one), the required hardware is basically the Driver Assistance Package with Adaptive Cruise as far as I can tell. I wanted the feature, so I enabled it and tested it on my car, and it works.

Now, that's not to say Forscan doesn't present some risks. For instance, if you're not careful you can really mess up your as-built data in your modules, and get DTCs, dash lights, limited features, loss of functionality (including even critical driver assistance systems like automatic emergency braking), etc. So you have to be careful, and I certainly wouldn't recommend anyone mess with anything they don't feel confident in changing. But I've added all kinds of features to my car, and they work really well.

Will it affect the warranty? Well, I don't think Ford can reasonably make a case (nor would they even likely try) for saying an engine problem shouldn't be covered because I enabled Distance Indication, for instance. But if I had some problem with my Adaptive Cruise that I couldn't explain, they might, if they noticed it. However, it would never come to that because if I ever had a problem with my Adaptive Cruise, I'd pull DTCs, see what problems were reported, then follow proper service procedures, and certainly if I couldn't get it resolved right away I would disable the Distance Indication just as part of troubleshooting. So before it ever went back to Ford I'd have already run through whatever diagnostics and minor repairs I could do myself, including disabling the Distance Indication (or whatever other related Forscan mods I'd made for whatever system was failing). So at that point I'd know Forscan wasn't related to the failure, since settings would be back at normal just from debugging the problem, and Ford could focus on repairing whatever hardware was failing at that point.

So I look at it this way: I'm willing to accept responsibility for some level of debug and testing of my own car, and of course for properly using Forscan in the first place, in exchange for the added functionality. Some of this is that my background is technology so I'm very comfortable with this side of things, much more so than with, for instance, opening up an engine. I don't even change my own oil, but I'm not afraid to use Forscan on pretty much anything. But you have to find your own comfort level with things.

All of that said, I don't think that, unless Ford actually reprogrammed a module, they would likely even notice it. I think if I brought the car in for regular service (oil change or something) I don't think they'd even realize I had made any Forscan changes to anything. And even if they did, it's up in the air whether or not they'd care. It's not the drivetrain. But never say never, right? It just depends on what goes wrong, but like I said I'm fully prepared to debug things from a DTC/Forscan/IT side, no problem.
Thanks for the dets! I am mostly Apple and it seems like Forscan is mostly Windows friendly. I have an Apple Laptop the runs Windows as a virtual machine - that would probably work. The Windows VM is pretty solid for common Window programs. But may be unfriendly with Forscan.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for the dets! I am mostly Apple and it seems like Forscan is mostly Windows friendly. I have an Apple Laptop the runs Windows as a virtual machine - that would probably work. The Windows VM is pretty solid for common Window programs. But may be unfriendly with Forscan.
Hi @ColoradoGuy it should work but I think you'd have to configure the USB device for USB Passthrough (however you do that on whatever virtualization package you're using--Parallels maybe? You didn't say what you were using so I'm not sure). Basically you would want access to the raw USB device, that way the VM will just see it as a native device and Forscan can have full access to the hardware.
 

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Hi @ColoradoGuy it should work but I think you'd have to configure the USB device for USB Passthrough (however you do that on whatever virtualization package you're using--Parallels maybe? You didn't say what you were using so I'm not sure). Basically you would want access to the raw USB device, that way the VM will just see it as a native device and Forscan can have full access to the hardware.
I use VMware Fusion. So you buy a Forscan license - looked at their website and it seems the Forscan version is based on your OS. And what other hardware would you suggest? Ease of use and GUI for me I think...
 

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I use VMware Fusion. So you buy a Forscan license - looked at their website and it seems the Forscan version is based on your OS. And what other hardware would you suggest? Ease of use and GUI for me I think...
So I always recommend the OBDLink MX+ Bluetooth because that's the adapter I use, and I know it works well. But I think any of the OBDLink MX-whatever adapters (maybe even the LX too although I think that's older) should work.

Hardware-wise, it doesn't really require anything special. Just something with enough juice to run your Windows VM, which is any relatively modern system by this point. On the virtualization stuff, VMWare is a good choice and should work well for you. You want to allocate the adapter device (on the USB bus) directly to the VM. Dedicate it to the VM exclusively, that way the full hardware access is available to the guest machine.

Oh and when you get your license, make sure you've set everything up hardware- and software-wise first. Because the code you register with is, as you say, tied to your hardware (and software) config, and you won't want to have to change anything after you register or you might have to re-register.
 

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@Engineer thanks! I know enough to get started Now. I’m doing a little vacation soon so maybe I will dig in after that. See if I can brick my car. :)
 
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