Ford Fusion V6 Sport Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Because of Covid, my FFS stayed several months in the parking lot.
Between the 2 epidemic pics in LA, I succeeded doing an oil change.
Date of the oil change was 10/2020 and mileage was around 29000 miles.

This week the dashboard warned me to do oil change.
Life indicator shows 5%.

What is this crazy calculation?
Usually oil change is every year or every 6000 miles.
My car did only 800 miles during the pamdemic!
Does somebody have an explanation?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,837 Posts
It happened to my 2018 Explorer as well. I changed the oil one spring and stored the car in the garage until winter, and had reset the OLM before I stored it. Went to drive it in the winter the first time and it told me oil life was 0%.

This is why I keep telling people NOT to follow the oil life monitor as it is totally useless. Just change the oil every 5000 miles. Even Jay Leno said he changes the oil in his cars every 3000 miles and never mentioned the number of months etc...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Because of Covid, my FFS stayed several months in the parking lot.
Between the 2 epidemic pics in LA, I succeeded doing an oil change.
Date of the oil change was 10/2020 and mileage was around 29000 miles.

This week the dashboard warned me to do oil change.
Life indicator shows 5%.

What is this crazy calculation?
Usually oil change is every year or every 6000 miles.
My car did only 800 miles during the pamdemic!
Does somebody have an explanation?
Happened to me also. Got alerts through Ford pass with lowering % and miles to go with minimal miles.

I'm a low milage user 15k-17k kms per year. I change my oil twice a year, usually when I change my tires but not always. It would seem the meter was date based rather than distance based. Perhaps hours running may be a factor also as I let the car idle for 5 minutes in the morning in the winter. Not a great situation but I am glad its not only me. Ran for about 2 weeks before getting oil changed. The alert on the dash and Ford pass notifications were a bit annoying
 
  • Like
Reactions: DarkArkAngel

·
Premium Member
2017 Fusion Sport, 401A, Driver Assistance Package ; 1999 Expedition 5.4 4x4
Joined
·
252 Posts
It happened to my 2018 Explorer as well. I changed the oil one spring and stored the car in the garage until winter, and had reset the OLM before I stored it. Went to drive it in the winter the first time and it told me oil life was 0%.

This is why I keep telling people NOT to follow the oil life monitor as it is totally useless. Just change the oil every 5000 miles. Even Jay Leno said he changes the oil in his cars every 3000 miles and never mentioned the number of months etc...
This being said, I personally wouldn't go over a year on oil even with low mileage. I figure that other things besides heat can cause the oil to breakdown, and new oil every year at minimum sounds best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Our 2018 Fusion Sport calculates oil life on time factor also. If you parked it for one year without driving it would register 0%. Similar algorithm as our 2016 Corvette which does hibernate for about 4 months during the winter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,837 Posts
This being said, I personally wouldn't go over a year on oil even with low mileage. I figure that other things besides heat can cause the oil to breakdown, and new oil every year at minimum sounds best.
I've gone 5-6 years without changing the oil in some vehicles that aren't used. The stuff that breaks down oil are the combustion byproducts, not necessarily time itself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,837 Posts
Our 2018 Fusion Sport calculates oil life on time factor also. If you parked it for one year without driving it would register 0%. Similar algorithm as our 2016 Corvette which does hibernate for about 4 months during the winter.
So I thought about it being based on time as well but it isn't. I can park my Fusion Sport for 6-8 months and my oil life monitor wouldn't drop much if at all.
My 2009 Cobalt SS Turbo's oil life monitor still shows like 75% after having the oil changed the last time in 2014.

I think Ford's system glitches out from time to time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
Because of Covid, my FFS stayed several months in the parking lot.
Between the 2 epidemic pics in LA, I succeeded doing an oil change.
Date of the oil change was 10/2020 and mileage was around 29000 miles.

This week the dashboard warned me to do oil change.
Life indicator shows 5%.

What is this crazy calculation?
Usually oil change is every year or every 6000 miles.
My car did only 800 miles during the pamdemic!
Does somebody have an explanation?
Hi Valerian. Is it possible the IOLM was not reset when the oil change was performed in 10/2020?

My explanation/thoughts/guess are that the OILM was not reset back in October of 2020. Or reset for 6 months instead of a year (possible on some vehicles). You don't mention who performed the oil change (you or a shop).

If it was reset properly, then it seems there may be a glitch in the IOLM system (as others have mentioned).
Therefore, if your Fusion is still within the 3 year/36,000 mile New Vehicle Warranty or an ESP that covers it, you should have it addressed by your Ford Dealer.

On a related note: If you check your Owners Manual, you will find the Oil Change Interval and OILM works on an interval of 1 year/10,000 mile (whichever comes first). Or if the IOLM illuminates sooner.

Of course, we can perform earlier oil changes if we wish, but 1year/10,000 miles is the maximum.

Let us know how you make out and good luck.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Engineer

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
Based on time and milage. I got an alert after having only driven 1,000mi. I change mine every 6-8 months regardless of milage. My used to be just a weekend toy since I had a company vehicle, but now it's my DD. Problem is I only have a five mile commute, so I worry the engine never gets hot and I don't want condensation getting into the oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
After reading all the answers I understand that it is a OILM glicth.
I will reset it manually and make the oil change in August when my car will be 4 years old.
Last oil change was made by the dealer at the 30 000 miles visit.

The dealer did not change the gearbox fluid.
I want also a gearbox fluid change in August as I am driving in LA traffic.
My plan is to keep this car a few more years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,503 Posts
I decided not to use some Mobil 1 oil that was new, but close to 15 years old recently. But really outside of new oil being THAT old,
I have had no issue with new "old" oil being used years later and cars that sit around for many years and oil just sitting.

Obviously, I would not do something extreme, like run my car on a road course with oil that sat 2 years previously.
That said, I have a 79 Bronco I use to tow my boat. It sits a LONG time, and gets an oil change maybe every 3-5 years.

I'm sure has some convoluted "time" built into the monitor, which is why it comes up anyway with little mileage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
After reading all the answers I understand that it is a OILM glicth.
I will reset it manually and make the oil change in August when my car will be 4 years old.
Last oil change was made by the dealer at the 30 000 miles visit.

The dealer did not change the gearbox fluid.
I want also a gearbox fluid change in August as I am driving in LA traffic.
My plan is to keep this car a few more years.
Hi valerian. Just curious: When you state "After reading all the answers I understand that it is a OILM glicth.", does that mean you think the IOLM was not reset? Or does that mean you believe there is something wrong ("a glitch" in the system")?

Who performed the oil change in 10/20? You or a shop? If you performed it, did you reset the IOLM?
If a non-Ford Dealer shop performed the oil change, it is more likely they did not reset the IOLM than that there would be a system "glitch".
However, if a Ford Dealer performed the oil change, then it is more likely they would not forget to reset the OILM and there may be a system "glitch" that should be looked at by your Ford Dealer (hopefully while still within Warranty).

I am certainly not discounting the possibility of a system "glitch", only theorizing that the simplest/most likely cause is usually the cause (Occam's razor). And in this case, the most likely (but not only) cause would seem to be the that IOLM was not rest in 10/20.

Let us know how you make out and good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
I decided not to use some Mobil 1 oil that was new, but close to 15 years old recently. But really outside of new oil being THAT old,
I have had no issue with new "old" oil being used years later and cars that sit around for many years and oil just sitting.

Obviously, I would not do something extreme, like run my car on a road course with oil that sat 2 years previously.
That said, I have a 79 Bronco I use to tow my boat. It sits a LONG time, and gets an oil change maybe every 3-5 years.

I'm sure has some convoluted "time" built into the monitor, which is why it comes up anyway with little mileage.

Hi gang. Just to add to what OX1 stated above: New "old" oil sitting in the container on a shelf in our garage does not go bad. No expiration date.
However, the thing to keep in mind is that oil specifications/additives, engineering and technologies etc. etc., change and advance over the years. And it changes very quickly nowadays. And that case of New "old" Mobil 1 (or whatever brand) sitting in the garage for 15-20+ (or possibly only 5-10) years may no longer meet the modern specifications of a 2017+ TDI engine.

So, at least while still within warranty, we should all make sure the oil we use meets and/or exceeds the specifications listed for our vehicles, in our Owners Manuals. And if that old case of Mobil 1 (or whatever brand) sitting in our garage for many years does not meet the modern, Ford mandated specifications for our vehicle, don't use it if we care about your warranty.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,837 Posts
The oil back in 2005 may have met GM4718M which is what GM called for its LNF engines (2.0 GTDI) before Dexos 1 Gen 2 and LSPI even was understood. The high Calcium levels talked about by Toyota being contributors to LSPI wasn't widely covered back then either. But nothing should come to harm, just don't plan to run 24 hours of LeMans on that oil.

The latest API SP and ILSAC GF-6A came out May 2020, so most of the stores carrying new oil should have oils that meet these. I recommend just going by the licensed Dexos 1 Gen 2 list of oils, as they are certified to meet Dexos 1 Gen 2 which is important for GTDI engines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
220...221 whatever it takes. ;)

The short version...If an owner cares about his/her factory warranty, just use an oil that meets the Ford required specification listed in the Owners Manual that came with our cars.
For the 2019 Fusion Sport, that is a 5W/20 5W-30 oil meeting the WSS-M2C945-B1 specification. And the specifications an oil meets are listed right on the oil case/container, so it can not be simpler.
Why make life harder than it needs to be?

The longer version :): Many owners can not seem to find the time to skim through the important parts of their Owners Manual, let alone waste time figuring out the latest API SP and ILSAC GF-6A charts, Calcium levels, volatility, friction coefficients etc, etc., then comparing them to old standards, and then attempting to figure out what will or will not meet modern standards:

So at least while a vehicle is still within the 3 year/36,000 mile New Vehicle and 5 year/60,000 mile Powertrain warranties, be sure to use an oil that meets and/or exceeds the Ford required oil specifications.

So, if that 5, 10, 15, 20+ year old case of oil does not meet the specification (5W-30 WSS-M2C945-B1), then we should not use it in our new car. Use it in an older vehicle.

On the other hand: If warranty coverage is not that important or does not matter at all, then a vehicle owner should feel free to use whatever oil they choose.

And yes, most synthetic blend and full synthetic oils sold today will meet the specs of a modern engine. But just take a minute to read the container and be sure.

Therefore.. I recommend doing what Ford requires, since it is the one thing we can do that will not jeopardize warranty coverage, in the rare case of an engine related failure.
Seems like a no-brainer, since they designed, engineered and manufactured the engines and cars we drive.

Good luck to everyone, whatever they may decide to do.

EDITED to correct oil viscosity.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Engineer

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,837 Posts
The Fusion Sport's 2.7L EcoBoost takes 5W-30 not 5W-20. Here's my take on the Ford specification. I can never remember their a$$inine numbering for the specs. 99% of the time, an oil that is licensed for Dexos 1 Gen 2 will meet/exceed Ford's specification, same with it carrying API SP and ILSAC GF-6A. As a matter of fact, API SP and GF-6A address timing chain wear from soot as well as LSPI which are specific issues to GTDI engines. So the easiest way to go about this is to look for a synthetic 5W-30 that is licensed Dexos 1 Gen 2 and meets API SP and ILSAC GF-6A. Chances are highly that it also meets the latest Ford spec du jour. Kirkland Signature meets all of these and are licensed Dexos 1 Gen 2 oils. Change it every 5k miles, same as if you spent $10-$20/qt for online boutique extended interval oils because of the nature of GTDI engines.

But the Mobil 1 oil from 15 years ago should meet GM4718M if it is 5W-30, as that was the official factory fill for Corvette and some Porsche, as well as the LNF engine in the Opel GT / Sky Redline / Solstice GXP / Cobalt SS Turbo. That's what I used in the Cobalt before Dexos 1 Gen 2 came about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
The Fusion Sport's 2.7L EcoBoost takes 5W-30 not 5W-20. Here's my take on the Ford specification. I can never remember their a$$inine numbering for the specs. 99% of the time, an oil that is licensed for Dexos 1 Gen 2 will meet/exceed Ford's specification, same with it carrying API SP and ILSAC GF-6A. As a matter of fact, API SP and GF-6A address timing chain wear from soot as well as LSPI which are specific issues to GTDI engines. So the easiest way to go about this is to look for a synthetic 5W-30 that is licensed Dexos 1 Gen 2 and meets API SP and ILSAC GF-6A. Chances are highly that it also meets the latest Ford spec du jour. Kirkland Signature meets all of these and are licensed Dexos 1 Gen 2 oils. Change it every 5k miles, same as if you spent $10-$20/qt for online boutique extended interval oils because of the nature of GTDI engines.

But the Mobil 1 oil from 15 years ago should meet GM4718M if it is 5W-30, as that was the official factory fill for Corvette and some Porsche, as well as the LNF engine in the Opel GT / Sky Redline / Solstice GXP / Cobalt SS Turbo. That's what I used in the Cobalt before Dexos 1 Gen 2 came about.
Hi metroplex. Yes, 5W-30, you are correct. I looked too quickly before and took the spec from the wrong chart in the Owners Manual (2.5L engine). I will correct my previous reply to avoid confusion for others. And will also point out that was another perfect example of why everyone should look in their own Owners Manual, instead of take the word of Internet strangers. Internet strangers can make honest mistakes, give opinions as advice, give intentionally malicious advice, and an entire spectrum in between.

Concerning the rest of your reply: First...If remembering the Ford spec is too hard, place a note stating (My Fusion Sport uses WSS-M2C945-B1 spec oil) on your smart phone. It is right on the case and containers. Problem solved.
Next...People have the choice of taking their chances on your advice to follow GM oil specs (they do not warranty our cars), "Chances are highly's" and "...should meet's...", or they can simply follow the requirements that Ford tells them to do with their Ford vehicle (the company that actually makes our cars). Use an oil that meets the Ford WSS-M2C945-B1 spec, not a GM spec that may or may not be the same.

So following Ford's requirement is actually the easiest way. Again, why make life harder than need be.

Your "Chances are highly..." and "...should meet..." qualified statements remind me of the Tracy Morgan "I'm pretty sure" commercials. Everyone here can take their chances with "Chances are", "should meet", and pretty sures, or do what Ford requires and be certain:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,837 Posts
I’m still going to just buy the Kirkland Signature Oil. Ford keeps changing their spec number so whatever in your manual may not be what’s current. Keep that in mind. So you may be running around trying to buy oil based on an outdated spec number. API SP and ILSAC GF6A and Dexos 1 Gen 2 are more important. Amsoil doesn’t even carry any certifications or licensing because they use independent tests or copy and paste specs they claim to meet but people have no problems running it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
I’m still going to just buy the Kirkland Signature Oil. Ford keeps changing their spec number so whatever in your manual may not be what’s current. Keep that in mind. So you may be running around trying to buy oil based on an outdated spec number. API SP and ILSAC GF6A and Dexos 1 Gen 2 are more important. Amsoil doesn’t even carry any certifications or licensing because they use independent tests or copy and paste specs they claim to meet but people have no problems running it.
Hi metroplex. Keep this in mind: Oil Technology progresses over time, not regresses. The newer specs supersede the older specs and are backward compatible. So the newer spec you can buy on the shelf in a year, two years or five will be backward compatible to the current spec. Come on, I am sure you know that (anyone giving oil advice should).

Therefore, no one will "...be running around trying to buy oil based on an outdated spec number." I am sure you know that too, or ought to.

And the reason Amsoil does not perform API testing is because they do not want to pay for it. Amsoil not doing API testing because they do not want to pay for it, then claiming their oil meets specifications "...because they use independent tests or copy and paste specs they claim to meet", is certainly not a selling point. It is just what they have decided to do (or not do) with their research and marketing dollars. And it is also why I advise people not to use Amsoil, when asked.

Again, the choice on using the correct oil specification comes down to follow "I'm pretty sure" advice, or follow Ford's requirements and "Be certain". The choice is now up to everyone else, not you and me.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
583 Posts
Somebody get these two a room.🤣.
Man, I wish I had half the knowledge @metroplex and @bbf2530 have about mechanics. I'm not being sarcastic!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Engineer
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top