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Anyone have more info on this? I'm searching for a more detailed article.

Suspension Of The 2017 Ford Fusion Sport | Ford Authority

the new 2017 Ford Fusion V6 Sport also features a continuously-controlled damping system that warrants some discussion. Continuously-controlled dampers such as those to be used in the new Fusion Sport sedan use solenoid valves to alter the flow of hydraulic fluid within the damper cylinder. That solenoid valve is controlled by a computer which continuously scans input data to determine when to stiffen or soften the damper.

The overall effect is quite akin to that achieved by magnetorheological shocks, but these dampers are more economical, and don’t suffer from the same latency of charge dissipation from the fluid. Ultimately, this means that the 2017 Ford Fusion V6 Sport ought to deliver composed, controlled cornering with little body roll, and still prove smooth and comfortable over rough pavement.

In addition, Ford has announced that the 2017 Ford Fusion Sport will ship with “pothole detection technology,” which scans the road continuously for sudden dips and divots and alerts the damper controller. The shocks are then adjusted precisely at just the right moment to minimize the impact on vehicle occupants.
 

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I think the article you found aptly summarized the suspension system. It's a system to constantly adjusts itself within a blink of an eye, Think Ford used it in the GT350 Mustang too.
 

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I believe chevy has it too in the corvette which on the track makes it one impressive track monster, a big step up coming from what the corvette used to be. It's almost becoming the industry standard for high performance vehicles.
 

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Theirs seems to be the more specific description of it, NukeFusion has it summarized in a short sentence. It just adjusts itself to suit the roads like a speed bump or a pothole so you're always riding without feeling the bumps.
 

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The active suspension is the most impressive aspect of this car to me. Acura has used it in the past, GM uses it on the Corvette, and all the supercar makers do to. The car uses its sensors to determine your current driving needs. When you're cruising down the highway, it'll adjust the suspension for a comfortable ride, but in a split second, it can adjust the suspension to a stiff setting if you're tearing around corners. Smooth ride and great handling theoretically. You can have you your cake and eat it too. I think Honda has or is doing this for performance civics, but otherwise the fusion is probably the cheapest car on the market to offer it. Exciting stuff.
 

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Anyone have more info on this? I'm searching for a more detailed article.

Suspension Of The 2017 Ford Fusion Sport | Ford Authority
Here are some more specifics about the system (from Lincoln). Just remember that the Sport only has Normal and Sport modes. Comfort is Lincoln only.

Continuously Controlled Damping

CCD offers three modes (sport, normal, comfort) that are accessible using MyLincoln Touch™ or controls on the steering wheel. CCD provides an agile, smooth and confident ride by quickly adjusting the shocks to any road. It uses an advanced suite of sensors that constantly monitor the vehicle’s suspension motion, body movement, steering and braking. The algorithm uses data from these sensors to adjust the suspension damping in milliseconds to help keep the body of the vehicle quiet and smoothly on track.

  • CCD system monitors 46 inputs that provide real-time data
  • CCD suspension reads 46 inputs every two milliseconds
  • CCD suspension reacts on average within 20 milliseconds
  • CCD has 12 sensors that speed-read the road and adjust the suspension faster than the blink of an eye
  • Each wheel/shock responds independently of the other three, allowing it to tailor its action to the specific condition it’s dealing with
  • The system allows for near-infinite variability of suspension response
  • CCD slows sudden changes in motion, CD helps to reduce roll, pitch and vertical velocities
  • CCD noticeably enhances driving comfort and dynamics by adjusting damping force for each individual wheel
  • CCD helps isolate vehicle from undesired road harshness
https://media.lincoln.com/content/dam/lincolnmedia/lna/us/2014/03/19/Lincoln_CCD_R03.pdf
 

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Bamm1 said:
Just remember that the Sport only has Normal and Sport modes. Comfort is Lincoln only.
Based on what's written in the Fusion owner's manual, the Normal/Sport modes only affect the transmission. It makes no mention of it affecting suspension/CCD as well.

Are you saying the Fusion has two CCD modes (Normal/Sport) too, just like Lincoln?
 

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Based on what's written in the Fusion owner's manual, the Normal/Sport modes only affect the transmission. It makes no mention of it affecting suspension/CCD as well.

Are you saying the Fusion has two CCD modes (Normal/Sport) too, just like Lincoln?
Sorry, let me clarify.

The 2017 Fusion owner's manual only mentions CCD in the context of which fuse is related to that function. It is completely silent otherwise.

If you look at a Lincoln owner's manual it mentions the modes and how to control them (steering wheel / headunit). I expect to see similar control architecture on the Fusion Sport.

Based on the information that has been released to date it looks like the CCD "modes" will be as follows:

Lincoln (all models with CCD) - 3 modes (Sport, Normal & Comfort)
Fusion Sport - 2 Modes (Normal & Sport)

Looks like they are keeping some differentiation for Lincoln.
 

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If you look at a Lincoln owner's manual it mentions the modes and how to control them (steering wheel / headunit). I expect to see similar control architecture on the Fusion Sport.
Why would you expect it, when it is not mentioned in the owner's manual? I'd say that is very unlikely. :)
 

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Why would you expect it, when it is not mentioned in the owner's manual? I'd say that is very unlikely. :)
What is very unlikely?

That the system would use all of the same sensors and calculation algorithm?

That you would be able to change the settings on the steering wheel and using Sync 3?

It seems very likely as retrofitting the CCD system from the MKZ to the Fusion is the most cost effective way for Ford to add this feature.

Are you thinking that the Fusion Sport has to have a "sportier" versions of the CCD system? The driver's package for the MKZ includes reprogrammed CCD so I think they would just port that over as well if they are leaning to the firmer side of things for the Sport.

Side note on the owner's manual. The reason this feature is seemingly absent is most likely due to the fact that the 2017 Fusions released so far would not have it. No Sports are in consumer hands yet. When they are I expect to see a ver. 2 of the owner's manual with very similar language to the Lincoln manual (minus the comfort setting that is).
 

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I can't say I've read the manual word for word but I haven't seen any place where the CCD suspension can be adjusted. In the manual the S button deals with the transmission, but there's no mention of suspension settings. Any one seen that?

Ken
 

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I can't say I've read the manual word for word but I haven't seen any place where the CCD suspension can be adjusted. In the manual the S button deals with the transmission, but there's no mention of suspension settings. Any one seen that?

Ken
I have been digging around the internet for a week or so trying to understand how this suspension works. I might have to reach out to a few Ford buddies and see what they can come up with.
 

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I have been digging around the internet for a week or so trying to understand how this suspension works. I might have to reach out to a few Ford buddies and see what they can come up with.
Mechanically? or control wise?

Mechanically I understand there's an electronically controlled valve that keeps fluid from moving from one side of the shock to the other, to stiffen it as desired. The valve control is very high speed (1/60th of a second, IIRC) allowing minute control of suspension stiffness. Personally the pothole detect seems pretty underwhelming to me, but body roll around corners (especially hard cornering) is dramatically better than in the '14 Fusion Titanium. The outside suspension stiffens up noticeably when cornering.


I'd expect road track numbers (if anyone even runs them on a car like this) would be dramatically better along with some improvements in skid pad tests (though that's probably more dominated by tire grip and side wall strengths than suspension).


Control wise (to the driver) I'm unaware of any adjustments, unfortunately. Though it's been speculated that S mode might stiffen the suspension some, if it does it's outside my sensitivity to feel the difference. And AFAIK the book doesn't say anything about that happening.
 

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I can't say I've read the manual word for word but I haven't seen any place where the CCD suspension can be adjusted. In the manual the S button deals with the transmission, but there's no mention of suspension settings. Any one seen that?

Ken
After driving my Sport for a week, I can say that the suspension is firmer in Sport mode. There is no adjustment for it. Since the suspension is software controlled, this would be trivial to implement.

The owner's manual also shows a menu to adjust the steering effort in normal and sport mode, but it doesn't appear on my car. That would also require only software, so perhaps it will be added later?
 

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The owner's manual also shows a menu to adjust the steering effort in normal and sport mode, but it doesn't appear on my car. That would also require only software, so perhaps it will be added later?
That would be interesting. I wonder if those displays can be updated remotely now. In Sync2 a MFT update could not (AFAIK) modify those display. I hope they can, I find the lack of a bar graph for mileage very annoying (even though I felt the old one sucked anyway)
 

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That would be interesting. I wonder if those displays can be updated remotely now. In Sync2 a MFT update could not (AFAIK) modify those display. I hope they can, I find the lack of a bar graph for mileage very annoying (even though I felt the old one sucked anyway)
SYNC3 can be configured to update over WiFi. I don't know if any of the features that control the power train or chassis can be updated as well (a'la Tesla).
 

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SYNC3 can be configured to update over WiFi. I don't know if any of the features that control the power train or chassis can be updated as well (a'la Tesla).
Yeah, I'm aware of how Sync3 can update, it's just that previously that was all that could update. Anything else would have to be done at the dealer (if at all)
 

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And here we are, the third week and into having these cars in consumer's hands and we still don't have any new information on this car, forcing us to argue whether or not the S button affects the dampers or what an instrumented 0-60 is! No more pressers from Ford, no official reviews. To say I am frustrated is a gross understatement. What is going on out there?!
 

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Well, at least we can say that the CCD is what could also be called an adaptive suspension. The Ford press releases talked about "pothole" mode, which was supposed to allow near instant increases in compliance to prevent wheel damage on severe potholes (or, one would assume, frost heaves). This is because the magneto-rheological shocks actually control the viscosity of the shock fluid with a magnetic field, which can be cycled much more quickly than changing valving on a purely mechanical shock.

On my test drive, I didn't find the difference between sport and normal to be night and day, but I think there was some mild difference. It should include both more resistance to body roll (stiffening the shocks on the outboard wheels) as well as anti-dive and anti-squat, besides just feeling "harder".
 
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