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Can you REALLY tell a difference in Sport Mode?

  • Yes, positively

    Votes: 42 93.3%
  • Yes, maybe

    Votes: 1 2.2%
  • Not sure

    Votes: 2 4.4%
  • I don't think so

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just as a comparison my Cobalt SS is 3000 lb and uses ContiSportContact 2 summer tires in 225/40R18. The sidewall flex is almost non existent even though those tires are super thin. Even checking the tire pressure drops it by half a psi each time. Lol so if you slip with the gauge and lose some air it drops by a psi.
 

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There's about a half block of a road in downtown Edmonton that's being driven over by a lot of large vehicles due to construction in the area, it's a route I took daily pre-covid. The stretch of road is like a wavy bumpy section, almost makes one nauseous in comfort mode, however, if in sport mode it is much more tollerable due to less rebound in the suspension.

I can feel and appreciate the other changes it makes too (accel response, steering, etc.), but this is one that sticks out to me due the fact I utilized sport mode for it daily.
 

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That ping pong ball video was filmed in the parking lot at Ford. I showed that video to my girlfriend and she recognized the lot immediately.

BTW if you catch that ping pong ball in slow motion, you'll see the severe sidewall deflection at the impact of the pothole edge. That is how I lost 2 tires due to pinch flats: the rim would basically bottom out on the sidewall edge and it'd rupture. These tires are too thin for a vehicle of this weight IMHO.

I thought pothole detection worked by monitoring what the front wheels do and then adjusting the rear to compensate. In other words, the fronts will still hit the pothole but the rears will go over it. Is that wrong?
 

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That's pretty much how it works in practical terms. The first time I told my salesperson I lost 2 tires due to potholes, he said he thought the pothole mitigation system was designed to prevent that... LOL.
 

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I think I read the system scans the road 500 times per second and the shocks can react to a surface problem within 30 milliseconds or something like that. I might be a little off on the reaction time but not much, and I'm almost 100% certain on the 500 times per second part.
 

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I thought pothole detection worked by monitoring what the front wheels do and then adjusting the rear to compensate. In other words, the fronts will still hit the pothole but the rears will go over it. Is that wrong?
Hi LeVel. No, both the front and rear suspensions react to the pothole.

Good luck.
 

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@MFGL, to clarify are you saying you get better mpg with Sport mode on, or Sport off?
Colorado, he is stating that he gets better gas mileage with the traction control "off". Traction Control utilizes break application to help with traction thus the car is working against itself.
 

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Adaptive Suspension:

  • Delivers enhanced ride and handling without sacrificing one for the other.
  • Enhances both ride and handling through the use of advanced electronics and variable shock absorber valving.
  • Can continuously change shock absorber damping setting in milliseconds based on 46 different real-time inputs such as speed, acceleration, braking, cornering, steering input, etc.
  • Each wheel/shock responds independently of the other 3, allowing the system to optimize shock settings for virtually all ride and handling situations.
  • Transmission rotary gear shift dial includes center (S) button. Pressing the button engages a different driving profile in the damping system for more aggressive handling dynamics.

Pothole Detection System:

Adaptive suspension with pothole detection can provide some protection against jarring impact and costly wheel and tire repairs from road imperfections.

  • Uses advanced computer-controlled shock absorber system.
  • 12 high-resolution sensors can adjust suspension dampers every two milliseconds.
  • Starts operating as soon as the vehicle encounters the lip of a pothole.
  • Adjusts the shock absorber to its stiffest setting so the front wheel won't fall into the hole.
  • Because the tire and wheel don't drop as far, they don't strike the opposite side of the pothole as harshly.
  • System now knows that the rear wheel will encounter the pothole as well and provides the same preemptive course of action.
 
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One thing I just thought of while driving tonight, what kind of tires do you have @ColoradoGuy ? When I use my Bridgestone RE760 summer tires, even in comfort the ride is extremely stiff, for example. I notice a significant difference with the ContiProContact tires that came with my Escape wheels tho.

So at least as far as the CCD goes, tires can definitely make a difference.
 
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Adaptive Suspension:

  • Delivers enhanced ride and handling without sacrificing one for the other.
  • Enhances both ride and handling through the use of advanced electronics and variable shock absorber valving.
  • Can continuously change shock absorber damping setting in milliseconds based on 46 different real-time inputs such as speed, acceleration, braking, cornering, steering input, etc.
  • Each wheel/shock responds independently of the other 3, allowing the system to optimize shock settings for virtually all ride and handling situations.
  • Transmission rotary gear shift dial includes center (S) button. Pressing the button engages a different driving profile in the damping system for more aggressive handling dynamics.

Pothole Detection System:

Adaptive suspension with pothole detection can provide some protection against jarring impact and costly wheel and tire repairs from road imperfections.

  • Uses advanced computer-controlled shock absorber system.
  • 12 high-resolution sensors can adjust suspension dampers every two milliseconds.
  • Starts operating as soon as the vehicle encounters the lip of a pothole.
  • Adjusts the shock absorber to its stiffest setting so the front wheel won't fall into the hole.
  • Because the tire and wheel don't drop as far, they don't strike the opposite side of the pothole as harshly.
  • System now knows that the rear wheel will encounter the pothole as well and provides the same preemptive course of action.
LOL You saw the Ford video right? The front tire impacts the edge of the pothole so hard that the sidewall is pretty much completely deflected. That's how I got 2 pinch flats, back to back after replacing that same tire. It doesn't work as a pothole mitigation system in a real world application. Ford should have selected the proper sized tires for the Fusion Sport. The MKZ gets 245/45R18 or 245/40R19, even on the lighter 2.0 models as well as the 3.0, FWD or AWD, not that much thicker of a tire in the 19 inch size but we could get Conti DWS06 which will handle curbs at 45 mph, let alone a pothole.
 

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@MFGL, to clarify are you saying you get better mpg with Sport mode on, or Sport off?
In my case when car was bone stock and under 20k miles I was getting 28-30mpg on the turnpike - lots of steady, fairly level cruising at 75mph depending on wind conditions and what type of fuel (winter or summer blend) whether in Normal or Sport. I got 26mpg around town in Normal and 23-24mpg in Sport. Average combined was 26.4mpg. At 112k now and lots of mods later with cheap fuel for the last four years making it easier to be careless about economy, and my combined average is 23.2mpg. I consider that a small miracle. One thing to be said for a boosted small displacement V6 versus a big N/A V8 is that if you decide to go easy on it, it’ll reward you with great mileage.
 
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Adaptive Suspension:

  • Delivers enhanced ride and handling without sacrificing one for the other.
  • Enhances both ride and handling through the use of advanced electronics and variable shock absorber valving.
  • Can continuously change shock absorber damping setting in milliseconds based on 46 different real-time inputs such as speed, acceleration, braking, cornering, steering input, etc.
  • Each wheel/shock responds independently of the other 3, allowing the system to optimize shock settings for virtually all ride and handling situations.
  • Transmission rotary gear shift dial includes center (S) button. Pressing the button engages a different driving profile in the damping system for more aggressive handling dynamics.

Pothole Detection System:

Adaptive suspension with pothole detection can provide some protection against jarring impact and costly wheel and tire repairs from road imperfections.

  • Uses advanced computer-controlled shock absorber system.
  • 12 high-resolution sensors can adjust suspension dampers every two milliseconds.
  • Starts operating as soon as the vehicle encounters the lip of a pothole.
  • Adjusts the shock absorber to its stiffest setting so the front wheel won't fall into the hole.
  • Because the tire and wheel don't drop as far, they don't strike the opposite side of the pothole as harshly.
  • System now knows that the rear wheel will encounter the pothole as well and provides the same preemptive course of action.
Hi gang. As shown in Engineer's link, the Pothole Detection/Mitigation System helps detect and mitigate suspension deflection caused by potholes. And it does it for both the front and rear suspensions, as can be seen in the videos.

However, the thing to keep in mind is: It is a Pothole Detection/Mitigation system. It is not a Pothole Elimination system. It can not and does not alter the laws of physics.

Front/Rear weight distribution in our cars is somewhere in the 60/40 range. So when encountering a pothole, the heavier front end will drop more, due to weight and suspension drop. Again...the laws of physics. But...some situations that would normally result in wheel/suspension damage with no Pothole Detection system will be avoided by the actions of the Pothole Detection system. Not all, but some.

Bottom line is it will not eliminate wheel damage for everyone (especially with large diameter wheels/low aspect ratio tires), but it will eliminate wheel damage for some. We can't measure the damage that does not happen. We can only realize the damage is sometimes avoided. So despite the system, we all must still drive with caution.

Good luck.
 

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I would have been much happier with regular gas shocks/struts (like HD Bilsteins) with thicker sidewall tires. Leave the CCD for Lincoln/Cadillac type vehicles. This Fusion Sport has been the first vehicle in the past 20+ years that I've had issues with blowouts due to potholes. Could be the use of the extremely soft tires Ford selected combined with the thin sidewall and used on basically a Crown Victoria-weight vehicle. When the Fusion Sport first debuted that pothole mitigation technology was showcased and pushed, but CCD is now just a quiet blurb on the Ford/Lincolns that still use them.
 

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I personally bought the car every bit as much for the comfort/luxury features as for the performance. So for me the CCD was actually pretty big deal, and I would look a lot harder at other options if this car didn't have that feature. Just like AWD, for instance, same thing. I wanted a certain level of capability and features and CCD was part of that, once I became aware of the advantages.

Now, given all I've seen on here, when it's time to replace my tires I might go with P245/40/R19s instead of the P235s. Just because it opens up some more options. But I probably wouldn't own this car if it didn't have the advanced tech it has. That was a lot of why I bought it.
 

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Having owned the SHO, and driving my 18 Explorer most of the time, the CCD doesn't really offer much of an improvement over the SHO/Explorer traditional suspension other than having a slightly firmer ride in Sport mode. It's cool to have but not mandatory. I remember having this discussion 20+ years ago regarding the Crown Vic's rear air suspension in the HPP. It's cool to have but not mandatory. 17 years later, that system would lose air all the time and it's not cheap to repair. Regular coil springs from the CVPI were like $20 each back in the day.
 

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I personally bought the car every bit as much for the comfort/luxury features as for the performance. So for me the CCD was actually pretty big deal, and I would look a lot harder at other options if this car didn't have that feature. Just like AWD, for instance, same thing. I wanted a certain level of capability and features and CCD was part of that, once I became aware of the advantages.

Now, given all I've seen on here, when it's time to replace my tires I might go with P245/40/R19s instead of the P235s. Just because it opens up some more options. But I probably wouldn't own this car if it didn't have the advanced tech it has. That was a lot of why I bought it.
Hi Engineer. I agree with you. Maybe ~50 years ago, the fact that a car had radial tires instead of bias ply tires was showcased and pushed in car advertising...because radial tire technology was new and a selling feature. Then it was no longer new technology, so it was no longer showcased and pushed. Maybe ~60 years ago, it may have been FM radios that were showcased and pushed. Perhaps ~60 years ago it was air conditioning. Then power windows. Then gas shocks. Then adjustable suspensions. Then 4V OHC engines etc, etc, etc.

The fact that a feature is no longer showcased and pushed does not mean it does not work. It simply means it is now a more common feature. It only means it is not as unique, so newer features are showcased and pushed.

A fact of life is that new technology and features are showcased and pushed. Technology and features become quiet blurbs when they have already been around a few years and are no longer new technology.

So therefore, CCD is now a quiet blurb, while newer features and technology are showcased and pushed. That does not change how effective it is.

It is a wonderful country we live in. So I agree with Engineer...if I don't like the features of a car, I look for another car.

Good luck. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
One thing I just thought of while driving tonight, what kind of tires do you have @ColoradoGuy ? When I use my Bridgestone RE760 summer tires, even in comfort the ride is extremely stiff, for example. I notice a significant difference with the ContiProContact tires that came with my Escape wheels tho.

So at least as far as the CCD goes, tires can definitely make a difference.
@DiMiFo, thanks for the comment. I am running brand new Bridgestone Turanza Quiettrack all seasons. OEM tires were the Goodyear's. Neither tire provided much Sport-engaged change that I could perceive. I am coming to the conclusion that I am not driving it hard enough to notice a lot of the Sport-mode benefits.
 

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@DiMiFo, thanks for the comment. I am running brand new Bridgestone Turanza Quiettrack all seasons. OEM tires were the Goodyear's. Neither tire provided much Sport-engaged change that I could perceive. I am coming to the conclusion that I am not driving it hard enough to notice a lot of the Sport-mode benefits.
Hi CG. I find the most noticeable difference is the firmer suspension rebound control, and the transmission shift point mapping/how the trans holds gears at higher RPM's. To a lesser extent, I do notice the slightly firmer/stiffer steering feel.

The video that BOT_ROCKET provided that shows a Fusion sport going over the speed bump really illustrates the suspension rebound control very well, in my opinion.

After experimenting with the various settings in my MKZ, I now have S set up for the firmer Sport Suspension settings, but the Normal Performance settings. Only because in my particular case, I sometimes like the firmer suspension rebound control, but don't particularly need the more aggressive trans mapping. I guess I prefer to save a little gas. ;)

If I did a scientific sample, I would say that the majority of the time I leave the trans in D, using S once in a while.

I realize the Fusion Sport does not have all those settings from the factory, but they can be added with FORScan in most cases.

Good luck.
 

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Hi CG. I find the most noticeable difference is the firmer suspension rebound control, and the transmission shift point mapping/how the trans holds gears at higher RPM's. To a lesser extent, I do notice the slightly firmer/stiffer steering feel.

The video that BOT_ROCKET provided that shows a Fusion sport going over the speed bump really illustrates the suspension rebound control very well, in my opinion.

After experimenting with the various settings in my MKZ, I now have S set up for the firmer Sport Suspension settings, but the Normal Performance settings. Only because in my particular case, I sometimes like the firmer suspension rebound control, but don't particularly need the more aggressive trans mapping. I guess I prefer to save a little gas. ;)

If I did a scientific sample, I would say that the majority of the time I leave the trans in D, using S once in a while.

I realize the Fusion Sport does not have all those settings from the factory, but they can be added with FORScan in most cases.

Good luck.
Another option, for cars that don't have Lincoln IPCs installed and aren't running the 2017 firmware, would be to use a tune to copy the transmission mapping tables from Normal mode over to Sport. You could do that on any of these cars, regardless of firmware. Of course all the usual caveats apply there with regard to warranty, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
Colorado, he is stating that he gets better gas mileage with the traction control "off". Traction Control utilizes break application to help with traction thus the car is working against itself.
@maydk65, here's my stupid question. Can you turn Traction Control off with a user control, or is that a forscan thing or something else?
 
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